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More Home Owners Move To Private Rental Sector

More Home Owners Move To Private Rental Sector

Many new tenants in the private rental sector are former home-owners who have opted to become tenants due to the increasing financial pressures associated with home ownership.

In fact more people are quitting home ownership to become private tenants, than are leaving the private rental sector to become home-owners.

The “Generation Rent” trend was identified by the English Housing Survey, which estimated that there were 22 Million households in England in 2011/12.

The trend underlines the fact that home ownership levels in the UK have continued to fall over recent years as the number of households in private rental sector accommodation has increased.

  • 65% of property in the UK is owned by the occupiers
  • 17% are private rental sector properties
  • 17% are social housing

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The number of owner-occupied households has continued to fall, according to the latest English Housing Survey.

The EHS 2010/11 survey says there were 14.45 Million owner-occupied households, compared with a peak of 14.79 Million in 2005.

By contrast, the number of Private Rental Sector (PRS) households has dramatically increased to 3.62 Million, compared with 2.45 Million in 2005.

In 2010-11

  • 66% of households were owner occupiers
  • 17% were private renters
  • 17% were social tenants.

The biggest shift towards renting in 2010/11 was in the 16 to 34-year-old age group.

  • 36% of this age group were in owner occupation
  • 18% were social renters
  • 46% were renting privately.

When compared with 1991, 60% of this age group were owner occupiers and 18% were renting privately.

The average household size for all households was 2.3 people, with 29% of all households containing just one person.

Owner occupiers were richer than private tenants, but paid less on a mortgage than tenants did on rent. An owner-occupier household had an annual income of £40,900 (GBP) compared with £29,000 (GBP) for private tenants. Owner occupiers made average weekly mortgage payments of £143 (GBP), compared with average weekly rent of £160 (GBP).

On average, weekly mortgage payments were 19% of home owners’ income, while weekly rent payments were 43% of tenants’ income. Private tenants had the highest housing costs of all three groups – owner occupiers, private tenants and social tenants.

The English Housing Survey also noted a significant fall in the number of households with a mortgage, down from 8.3 Million in 1996-97 to 7.1 Million in 2010-11.

There has also been a major change in the type of mortgage: in 1996-97, 33% of mortgages were repayment loans, while in 2010-11 this had increased to 73%. Only 3% of mortgages were interest-only in 1996-97, but the proportion had increased to 13% in 2010-11.

The survey found that 59% of private tenants and 23% of social tenants expect to buy a residential property at some point, and 16% had considered buying a home in the previous 12 months.

However, there was not much confidence about UK property prices: in nearly every region other than London, a larger proportion of households thought their property value had decreased rather than increased in value over the previous year. Around 1% believed they were in negative equity.

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