Currently viewing the tag: "prs rent"
PRS Rental Prices Keep Going Up

PRS Rental Prices Keep Going Up

PRS Rents Increase 2.5% In The Past Year

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) latest Index of Private Housing Rental Prices, tenants in the UK’s private rental sector (PRS) have seen rents increase by an average of 2.5% in the 12 months up to June 2015,.

Private rental prices increased across the whole of the British isles with rents increasing by:

  • 5% in England
  • 1% in Scotland
  • 8% in Wales

PRS rents increased across all English regions during the year with rental prices increasing by 3.8% in London, while the overall Consumer Price Index (CPI) inflation stood at 0% over the same period.

Continue reading »

UK Rental Market Remains Healthy Despite PRS Rent Falls

UK Rental Market Remains Healthy Despite PRS Rent Falls

UK Rental Market Remains Healthy Despite PRS Rent Falls

Rental price increases in many UK regions have slowed according to the latest data gathered by the latest Buy-To-Let Index conducted by LSL Property Services group.

The data showed that UK PRS rents increased by 1.5% in the 12 months to December 2013, less than half the 3.2% growth observed in 2012 and on the whole, UK PRS rents fell by 1% in December 2013, (around £8), reducing the average private rental sector rent to £745 (GBP) per calendar month.

The largest drop in PRS rental prices was observed in the South East, with rents down 2% since November 2013, rents also fell 1.9% in both London and Wales.

Continue reading »

UK PRS Rents Rise Faster Than Tenant Income

UK PRS Rents Rise Faster Than Tenant Income

Working tenants renting property in the UK private rented sector have diminishing amounts of disposable income after new research revealed that average PRS rents rose four times faster than average UK salaries increased.

The March 2013 HomeLet Rental Index shows the average cost of renting property in the UK private rented sector increased by 3.3% during the first quarter of 2013 to average £776 (GBP) per month.

In contrast, the average amount working tenants earn in a year only increased by a minimal 0.8% over the same period to £27,300 (GBP).

Although the 3.3% rise is much higher than that of tenant income, the increase in PRS rents has apparently slowed.

Data from March’s report also shows the average cost of renting a property in the UK PRS in the first quarter of 2012 increased by 3.4% and a significant 6.9% in 2011.

Continue reading »

Gov Insist Direct Payment Deal Is Bringing PRS Rents Down

Lord Freud, the Government welfare reform minister, has claimed that the majority of UK landlords of benefits tenants have dropped their PRS rental prices in return for getting direct payments.

Government Out Of Touch On PRS Rents

Government Out Of Touch On PRS Rents

The “out of touch” statement does not reflect what is really happening in the UK Private Rental Sector or the rise of PRS rents and is giving misleading information to existing landlords.

The Government temporarily extended the discretion of local authorities to make direct payments to landlords last April when caps to Local Housing Allowance (LHA) were introduced, paying a maximum of £400 a week for a four-bed property.

Private sector landlords were told that they could only receive direct payment for tenants claiming benefits if they lowered their PRS rent. This simply is not true!

According to the essential landlords handbook written by theLHAexpert.com – UK Landlords can still receive direct rent payments for tenants claiming benefit if the tenant is classed as vulnerable.

Speaking at the National Landlords Association (NLA) annual conference, Lord Freud said “The measure has been very successful. In London alone, a third of claimants who tried to renegotiate their rent received a rent cut. This arrangement will stay in place for housing benefit claimants, prior to the move to Universal Credit. There has been no mass exodus of people moving out of city centres or widespread homelessness because of our housing reforms.”


Hmmm… I was under the impression that some local authorities had been criticised for shipping families out of their boroughs, in a bid to avoid local authority overspending on PRS rents…and London is the worst culprit!

In a report titled “Between A Rock And A Hard Place: The Early Impacts Of Welfare Reform On London”,by the Child Poverty Action Group and Lasa, a welfare rights charity, found that many councils are actively considering obtaining accommodation elsewhere, while others believe that making up private rent shortfalls will leave the authorities with gaping holes in their budgets. The report also predicts that 124,480 London residential households will be hit by a combination of cuts to Local Housing Allowance, the new benefit cap which means no household can claim more than £26,000 a year in total, and under-occupation penalties.

According to a survey in the Guardian, some London councils are already acquiring properties in Kent, Essex, Hertfordshire, Berkshire and Sussex, and are considering accommodation in Manchester, Hull, Derby, Nottingham, Birmingham and Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales.

This is despite guidance issued by former government housing minister, Grant Shapps telling councils in May 2012, that they must “as far as is reasonably practicable” offer accommodation for homeless families within the borough.

Prime Minister David Cameron told MPs last January at Prime Minister’s Questions that housing benefit reform had brought private rent levels down, a claim repeated last month by, newly appointed, government housing minister, Mark Prisk.

Local councils in London say that because of buoyant demand, Private Rented Sector (PRS) landlords see no reason to drop rents for benefits tenants, and that many landlords have already refused to accept applications from tenant’s claiming benefits.

So Mr Cameron does refusing tenant’s on benefit qualify as reducing LHA rents?

Just because there has been a drop in Government and local authority spending on LHA payments, it does not support the Governments claims. The real truth is that the Government are putting the squeeze on the UK PRS as they fear that landlords will make more profit than the government can either control or even tax.

Such a shame that the people who are supposed to be in charge of our country are so out of touch with the real world, especially in the wake of Friday’s post about “Record Rental Prices”.

Tenants without Rent Guarantee Insurance Face Higher PRS Rents

Tenants without Rent Guarantee Insurance Face Higher PRS Rents

Rental prices in the UK Private Rented Sector have now reached a new record high, with the average PRS rent during September across the UK reaching approximately £741 (GBP) per calendar month (pcm).

The startling cost of PRS rental was revealed by LSL property services and represents a rise of 1.1% on the previous record high of £734 (GBP) set in August 2012.

Taken as an annual average, PRS rents have increased by 3.2% across the whole of the UK.

Rental prices in London and the South-East regions went up the most, with PRS rents rising by 1.7% and 1.9% respectively.

Average rent in London is now 6.2% higher than in 2011, averaging £1062 (GBP) pcm.

In other parts of the UK there are still pockets where rental prices are being forced down due to tenants driving a hard bargain with landlords and letting agents. Rental prices saw a decrease in three UK regions in September:

  • East of England
  • Yorkshire & Humber
  • West Midlands.

However, the increase in PRS rental prices in the rest of the UK has also left tenants without Rent Guarantee Insurance financially struggling, with 9.1% of all rent due to landlords being late or unpaid at the end of September.

Landlords can take steps to ensure regular rental income and ease the financial burden faced by many tenants by obtaining market leading Rent Guarantee Insurance from Legal4Landlords.com

There Will Never Be A Better Time To Invest In Property

MyPropertyPowerTeam.co.uk helps property investors and landlords build their own property power team to enable them to profit from property - Visit our main site now!