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Bank Of England States That 2% Interest Rate Rise Would Put 480,000 Property Owners Into Mortgage Arrears

Bank Of England States That 2% Interest Rate Rise Would Put 480,000 Property Owners Into Mortgage Arrears

Bank Of England States That 2% Interest Rate Rise Would Put 480,000 Property Owners Into Mortgage Arrears

UK property buyers have an average mortgage debt of around £83,000 (GBP) plus many will have unsecured loans of up to £8,000 (GBP), however many are typically earning less than £43,000 (GBP) a year

The Bank of England has warned that up to half a million property owners could be at risk of falling into mortgage arrears once interest rates rise from their historic 0.5% low.

The BoE said the number of UK property owners expected to run into difficulties would increase by a third to approximately 480,000 in the event of a two-percentage-point increase in the cost of borrowing.

The BoE stressed the proportion of borrowers having trouble paying their mortgage loans should remain well below the record mortgage arrears levels of the early 1990’s, when the UK suffered its worst post-war property crash, provided that earnings incomes rose alongside interest rates.

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Bank Of Scotland Accused Of Mortgage Fraud

Bank Of Scotland Accused Of Mortgage Fraud

Northern Ireland Attorney General Accuses Bank Of Scotland Of Committing Mortgage Fraud

John Larkin QC, Northern Ireland’s Attorney General, has accused the Bank of Scotland of committing mortgage fraud in relation to the way that the bank has treated customers who fell behind on their residential property mortgages.

An earlier court hearing had previously ruled that the Bank of Scotland had unfairly re-billed some of their own customers who had fallen into arrears with their mortgage payments.

The Bank of Scotland had decided to appeal the verdict of the earlier court hearing but decided to drop that appeal on Monday morning. The Bank of Scotland then rejected Mr Larkin’s claims, saying it strongly takes issue with the allegations.

A barrister for the bank, Stephen Shaw QC, said Mr Larkin’s view of mortgage fraud was “based on a misapprehension”.

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CML Announce Buy To Let Mortgage Growth

CML Announce Buy To Let Mortgage Growth

The Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) has announced details on the growth of Buy-To-Let mortgages in the UK as more landlords enter the rental property market.

Over the past quarter, buy-to-let mortgages have created a gross total of £4.2 Billion (GBP) across 33,500 mortgages and CML reports that there are now around 1.46 Million buy-to-let mortgages held by landlords in the U.K.

According to the CML, by the end of March 2013 UK buy-to-let mortgages accounted for 13.4% of the total outstanding mortgage lending in the U.K.

The increase in lending for buy-to-let mortgages shows steady growth from the previous quarter at 13% and 12.9% at the end of the first quarter of 2012.

The latest CML report also highlighted that buy-to-let mortgages account for 8.3% of all mortgages reported as being in arrears over the past three months, a significant drop from the 10.5% reported in the first quarter of 2012.

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UK Council of Mortgage Lenders May Change Buy To Let T's & C's

UK Council of Mortgage Lenders May Change Buy To Let T’s & C’s

Lenders may have to change their terms and conditions on buy to let mortgages and rethink their attitudes towards standard tenancies, according to the UK Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML).

The Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) was responding to calls by Labour leader Ed Miliband for longer-term tenancies in the private sector after he said he wanted to see greater security offered to households in rental accommodation. Similar calls have also been mounted by Shelter, and longer tenancies were also discussed in Parliament at the end of January.

But the CML acknowledges that lenders are nervous about extended tenancy agreements because of the risk of a build-up of rental arrears leading to buy to let mortgage arrears, affecting lenders’ ability to repossess the property if a long-term tenant is in place.

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The much debated north-south divide could hardly be more apparent than when it comes to housing. It’s widely accepted that England has an almost two-speed housing market: in the south east, real estate is as much an investment as a home, creating a frenzy of competition between investors, foreign buyers, locals and commuters that keep house prices high. Houses further north can be a fraction of the cost, with prices dropping, more homes standing empty and high levels of housing debt.

The natural conclusion might be that the lower prices mean that housing in the north is more affordable. In reality, affordability is about the money you take home each month versus the cost of your home. The money in your pocket is most often determined by the local jobs market and average wages, which can be totally out of step with the cost of housing in a particular region. On a more local scale again, the picture can become even more complicated – a recent IPPR report into housing in Bradford, for example, found that those in the poorest and cheapest areas of the city spent proportionately more of their income on rent.

Shelter has just released new research showing where the nation’s repossession ‘hotspots’ are – those areas where the highest proportions of homeowners are at serious risk of losing their homes. We find huge variation across the country, with the greatest number of hotspots clustering around the North West and the North East, and a couple of stand out areas in the south, including Barking and Dagenham, Lewisham and Thurrock.

Click here to explore the interactive map of hotspots from Shelter.

Of the top ten hotspots nationally, five are in the north west. What does this tell us? Firstly, the cluster of repossession risk hotspots in the north reflects economic conditions, to some extent. Home repossessions are often triggered by job loss or other loss of income, and our analysis shows that unemployment is higher, and has risen faster, in the areas where risk of repossession is highest.

More recently this has been exacerbated by the ongoing squeeze on household finances. Housing costs take up a large chunk of most people’s take-home home pay. We know that many families have made huge sacrifices – including cutting back on food and fuel – to keep up their mortgage payments. But ultimately if your pay isn’t rising and the cost of everything else is, it’s difficult to keep budgets on track.

The high cost of housing affects all of us. While prices might be most out of control in London, Shelter’s research clearly shows that the northern market is dysfunctional too, with worryingly high numbers of households falling behind on their mortgages and facing the threat of repossession.

Source: Guardian.co.uk

Gross mortgage lending declined to an estimated £10.2 Billion (GBP) in April 2012.

Mortgage lending fell by 19% from £12.6 Billion (GBP) in March 2012 but was 2% higher than the total of £10.0 Billion (GBP) in April 2011, according to the Council of Mortgage Lenders.

CML chief economist Bob Pannell comments:“Mortgage lending activity has been relatively buoyant in recent months, with stronger lending for house purchase underpinning the more upbeat lending picture. The underlying picture is likely to be a bit stronger than the April figure suggests, because some first-time buyers are likely to have brought forward their transactions to March 2012 to take advantage of the stamp duty concession that was coming to an end in March 2012. Eurozone developments remain highly uncertain and have the potential to undermine UK economic prospects and conditions in our housing and mortgage markets. The underlying picture is likely to be one of easing momentum in the housing market, but with potential for a sharper downwards correction on bad Eurozone news.”

New figures released by the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML), show that the number of residential property repossessions remained relatively stable in the first quarter of this year.

According to the CML, some 9,600 residential property repossessions were recorded in the first three months of 2012, approximately the same amount recorded in the same quarter in 2011, although repossession statistics are up by 10% on the fourth quarter of 2011.

The CML have stated that the results of their findings correspond with a typical seasonal trend in UK property.

As a direct result of its findings for the first quarter of the year, the council of mortgage lenders may have to revise the repossession forecast for 2012 downwards from the expected 45,000 repossessions.

However, in a statement, the organisation added: “Continuing pressures on household finances, changes to welfare benefits and an upward drift in mortgage rates all have the potential to disrupt the current stable picture.”

The CML also indicated that the first quarter of 2012 saw a drop in the number of mortgages with arrears of 2.5% or more of their outstanding balance, dropping from 160,300 to 157,800 on a quarterly basis.

Institutional Investment is needed in UK Buy To Let Sector

Institutional Investment is needed in UK Buy To Let Sector

The Council of Mortgage Lenders, (CML), think the coalition Government’s Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne should be doing more to encourage institutional investors to take a stake in Buy To Let property in the upcoming Budget.

The Council of Mortgage Lenders are the trade body for all the UK’s major bank and building society residential mortgage lenders.

The CML claim encouraging pension funds and corporate investors is a neglected policy that could provide the cash for more UK homes that can be made available to rent.

The suggestion is part of a wide-ranging Budget review aimed at influencing the Chancellor to ease the mortgage market. The submission also criticises current housing policies, including:

• Stamp duty holidays for first time buyers, which the CML claims creates a boom and bust market around deadline dates
• Paying housing benefits direct to claimants may damage landlord cash flows and lead to unnecessary mortgage arrears and repossessions
• Making better use of housing stock as, the CML states, most of the homes available over the next 20 years have already been built

The CML has told the Chancellor that given the vulnerabilities and uncertainties, it is important to make sure that all avenues, for strengthening and diversifying funding structures, have been explored.

The CML have also noted that the government continues to explore the obstacles to greater institutional investment in the supply of private rental property, but, strangely, the further scope for promoting domestic institutional investor interest in mortgage assets seems to be a neglected area of policy.

The Budget report also points out that UK banks and building societies rely heavily on raising funds from wholesale markets which are currently challenged by the Eurozone debt problems.

“Funding costs remain higher than a year ago, and the UK remains vulnerable to future eurozone developments. Given that current market conditions are somewhat fragile, it is very important that other government policies do not undermine housing market sentiment more generally. We believe that there are a few areas where policies are not as well aligned as they could be.” says the CML.

The CML’s calls echo the sentiment of many existing UK landlords who have had to search for a variety of additional landlord services such as insurance, tenant referencing and tenant eviction services from private sector specialist suppliers, in order to remain in a profitable situation.

With institutional investment into the UK private rented sector (PRS) specialist products and services for landlords will be enhanced for the corporate market and derivatives would be more affordable and even more readily available.

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