Currently viewing the tag: "HSBC"

UK Cities With Best and Worst Property Investment Yields

UK Cities With Best and Worst Property Investment Yields

Best And Worst UK Property Investment Hotspots

Rental returns on buy to let properties are best in cities like Southampton, Manchester and Nottingham, where as many as one in four properties are owned by landlords in the private rented sector.

Portfolio landlords and property investors are looking beyond London to identify regions where rental yields are almost three times as high as in the capital.

Rental yield is calculated by measuring the rental income against the properties cost

The latest data on buy-to-let yields provided by the HSBC bank, also shows the proportion of properties in each area that are already owned by landlords, with landlords already owning more than one in four properties in many of the top-yielding areas.

HSBC’s report draws on official data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and the UK Land Registry with rental data provided by Home.co.uk.

Top Property Investment Hotspots Revealed

Top Property Investment Hotspots Revealed

  • Southampton, currently tops the list for rental returns with rental yields of 8.73% Manchester has rental yields of around 7.98%
  • Nottingham has rental yields of around 7.67%
  • Blackpool has rental yields of around 7.63%
  • Hull has rental yields of around 7.47%

In all of these areas, except Hull, private rental sector (PRS) landlords already own more than one in five properties.

These areas offer relatively low property prices and have strong demand for rental property from large student and young professional populations – the characteristics that the experts say make for excellent buy-to-let investments.

Top 10 Property Investment Hot Spots By Rental Yields

Rank

Location

Housing privately rented (%)

Average house price

Average monthly rent

Gross rental yield (%)

1 Southampton 23.42 £143,011 £1,040 8.73
2 Manchester 26.85 £104,244 £693 7.98
3 Nottingham 21.64 £86,000 £550 7.67
4 Blackpool 24.16 £77,899 £495 7.63
5 Kingston upon Hull 19.02 £68,243 £425 7.47
6 Coventry 19.02 £110,029 £650 7.09
7 Oxford 26.11 £254,514 £1,489 7.02
8 Portsmouth 22.28 £146,709 £795 6.50
9 Liverpool 21.75 £91,175 £494 6.50
10 Cambridge 23.91 £185,414 £1,001 6.48

The lowest rental yields were registered in areas such as London where recent property price rises have outpaced the growth in rental yields and in some areas like Westminster 38% of property is privately rented.

Worst 10 Property Investment Areas By Rental Yield

Location

Housing privately rented (%)

Average house price


Average monthly rent

Gross rental yield (%)

Kensington and Chelsea 33.97 £1,236,605 £2,968 2.88
Thanet 21.96 £189,362 £524 3.32
Hastings 27.19 £184,787 £520 3.38
Haringey 30.33 £425,541 £1,200 3.38
Westminster 37.56 £890,272 £2,578 3.47
Hammersmith and Fulham 30.05 £685,797 £2,004 3.51
Richmond upon Thames 20.55 £540,379 £1,699 3.77
Camden 30.46 £715,831 £2,383 3.99
Ipswich 18.75 £158,925 £546 4.12
Lincoln 19.36 £124,789 £433 4.16

Head Of Mortgages at HSBC Peter Dockar, said: “House prices in the top-yielding locations – while still out of reach among many first time buyers – are relatively affordable for landlords investing in property and the demand from young professionals has pushed up rents and driven up the returns. London is often seen as the haven of property investment with many believing the streets are paved with gold. However, while the highest rents in the country are an attractive draw for landlords, high house prices in the capital squeeze yields and limit the returns available. As a result, returns can often be far more attractive in other areas so it certainly pays for landlords to do their research.”

Banks To Be Stress Tested On 35% Drop In House Prices

Banks To Be Stress Tested On 35% Drop In House Prices

Banks Stress Tested On 35% Drop In House Prices
And 5% Rise In Interest Rates

UK and Continental banks are to be stress tested using a worst case scenario in an effort to assess if they could cope with a house price slump of 35% or a sudden spike in interest rates to more than 5%, the exercise will be monitored by the Bank of England.

Sky News broke the story on Monday ahead of an official announcement on Tuesday by the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA), after learning that banks would be subjected to an armageddon style scenario to see if they have sufficient capital to withstand another economic slump.

A series of commercial real estate losses is expected to be applied to the banks’ balance sheets as part of the tests, but it’s not certain whether or not the interest rate hike will be quantified as part of the tests, but the 35% slump in property prices could reveal if banks and building societies would need to raise billions of pounds of fresh capital to survive, unless they can demonstrate their ability to withstand such a huge slump.

Continue reading »

EU Commission Fines Rate-Rigging Banks

EU Commission Fines Rate-Rigging Banks

EU Commission shocked that competing banks were in collusion

The European Commission has fined eight banks – including RBS – a total of £1.4 Billion (GBP) for forming illegal cartels to rig interest rates. The cartels operated in markets for financial derivatives, which are products used to manage the risk of interest rate movements.

A number of banks were engaged in the rigging of interest rate products intended to reflect the cost of interbank lending in euros, while another group fixed prices for products based on the Japanese yen.

The rates are used to set the price of Trillions of dollars (USD) of products, including mortgages.

Some were involved in both markets and more than one cartel, including RBS, which was fined a total of £325 Million (GBP). The fines are the first ever penalties for interest-rate rigging by the EU.

Continue reading »

Mortgage Loan Approvals Increase

Mortgage Loan Approvals Increase

More “Help To Buy” Mortgage Lenders Announced

The number of mortgages given to first-time buyers increased by a third in the 12 months to August 2013 according to the latest data from the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML), with new entrants to the property market accounting for 44% of all residential property purchases during the month.

The CML figures were published as Barclays became the latest high street lender to confirm it was signing up to the second part of the government’s Help to Buy scheme, which is designed to make more 95% mortgages available to first-time buyers, second steppers and home movers.

Barclays join Santander, RBS, Halifax and HSBC in confirming it will use the taxpayer-backed guarantee to make high Loan-To-Value (LTV) mortgages available for property purchasers, meaning that more than half of UK mainstream mortgage lenders are now signed up to provide more mortgages at higher loan to value ratios.

Continue reading »

A CHEAP mortgage bonanza could revive the housing market as lenders roll out exceptional deals.

Cheaper Mortgages On Way For UK

Cheaper Mortgages On Way For UK

The number of record-low mortgages have boomed since Christmas 2012, with several major  lenders launching fixed-rate products with an interest rate below two per cent.

Aaron Strutt, mortgage broker at Trinity Financial, said: “It’s been a great start to 2013 with lenders launching fantastically cheap rates. Many are once-in-a-lifetime deals.”

HSBC is the latest major lender to launch a fixed-rate deal below two per cent.

Continue reading »

Many UK homeowners traditionally plan to do major DIY projects to their properties during the extended Easter break, in a bid to improve living conditions and also in the hope of increasing the perceived value of their homes.

However, a new survey from HSBC claims that DIY improvements are not worth it anymore as DIY projects were adding less value to a property than they were a year ago.

According to HSBC’s valuation experts, a loft conversion is the safest investment, typically increasing the value of a residential property by £16,152, although the gain is 23% down on 2011.

An extension could add £15,665 (3% down), while a new kitchen may boost the value of a home by £4,577 (19% down).

The only major home improvement work to increase the relative return-on-investment in the past year is a new conservatory, putting on an average £9,420 in value to the property, up 14% on 2011 figures.

The survey also highlights that regional variations need to be considered when tackling home improvements.

For example, a residential property fitted with a new kitchen in London should increase the property’s value by an average of £9,125 (GBP), compared with £4,300 (GBP) in North-East England and £2,333 (GBP) in Scotland.

Paul Cutbill, Valuation’s expert at Countrywide Surveying Services, says: “Whilst sensibly improved and well presented homes will generally be attractive to potential purchasers, rising labour and material costs mean that the gap between the cost of improving and monies realised at the point of any sale has been reduced. Poor quality work and a lack of proper design, usually resulting from inadequate project budgeting and planning, can have a significant negative knock on effect to any added property value”.

The UK coalition Government’s NewBuy scheme was launched today, (12th March), aiming to provide a much needed boost for people seeking first-time buyer mortgages.

A recent survey by property portal Rightmove questioned over 2,726 potential house purchasers between March 5th and 7th 2012 about their awareness of the 95% NewBuy mortgages and how the new Government backed scheme might affect them.

Their results of the survey found that nearly 2 in every 5 first-time buyers believe that the introduction of the scheme means they are more likely to get on the housing ladder within the next 12 months.

The NewBuy scheme is available only on UK new-build properties.

However, some critics were already questioning the scheme before any official announcement was made.

Labour’s shadow housing minister Jack Dromey claimed that only 3 out of the original 7 lenders were participating, and that the number of developers in the scheme had fallen from 25 to 7.

The Council of Mortgage Lenders, which up until last week was unable to confirm whether the launch was even going to go ahead despite being co-architect of the scheme.

The CML issued a general, guarded statement, adding that it would issue further information when details of the scheme and participants were available.

CML Director General, Paul Smee, said: “NewBuy mortgages will help creditworthy borrowers who simply haven’t yet managed to build up a large enough deposit to gain access to finance to buy a newly-built home. NewBuy is good news for home-buyers, and potentially good news for jobs and the wider economy too. Borrowers need to understand the implications of high loan-to-value (LTV), borrowing, so we will be supporting the initiative with clear consumer information to help people decide whether NewBuy borrowing is an attractive option for them.”

The House Builders Federation (HBF) also issued a statement just days after it too had to admit it did not know for sure if today’s launch would go ahead.

Stewart Baseley, executive chairman of the HBF, said: “NewBuy will help thousands of people to meet their aspirations to buy a new home, freeing up the housing market and helping first-time buyers and those unable to take the next step on the ladder. The scheme will also provide a vital kick-start for house builders large and small who will be able to build the homes and create the jobs that the country desperately needs.

According to the research by Rightmove, 38% of those looking to buy for the first time stated they would be more likely to purchase a home over the next 12 months once the scheme was launched.

The scheme could also benefit ‘second-steppers’ – those looking to sell and trade up for the first time – with 24% of respondents in this group stating they would be more likely to purchase over the next 12 months.

Rightmove director Miles Shipside said: “NewBuy looks set to give a significant housing boost to the fortunes of those who need it the most. We’ve found that raising a deposit has long been the major obstacle for those looking to purchase a new home at the foot of the housing ladder. NewBuy helps address this challenge, and we’ve found that the knock-on effect is that, as of today, nearly two in five first-time buyers will be more likely to getting on the housing ladder via thanks to this initiative. First-time buyers and second-steppers have long been frustrated in their efforts to get on to or move up the housing ladder by prohibitive deposit requirements. Four out of ten first-time buyers cited ‘raising enough of a deposit’ to be their single biggest housing market concern in our recent First-Time Buyer Report. NewBuy opens the door to these groups and can also serve as a great stimulus to help safeguard and create jobs in the new build property sector.”

The HSBC and Yorkshire and Clydesdale banks have already said they will not be participating, and neither LloydsTSB or Santander have deals ready although Nationwide has said it will have NewBuy deals available.

Families who are looking to move into larger properties are finding themselves stuck in first-time buyer flats because they cannot sell their homes or get a mortgage.

A survey by LloydsTSB found that “second steppers”, those who have a first home to sell and who want to move up the ladder, are increasingly stuck in unsuitable accommodation.

The report reveals that home affordability for Second Steppers has become much less favourable and declining house prices have led to many homeowners being in negative equity.

Second Steppers are homeowners looking to sell their first home and move up the property ladder.

Many potential Second Steppers in today’s market would have bought close to the peak of the UK property market and are now finding it increasingly difficult to get off the “first rung”.

Many bought at the peak of the market in 2007, and may have negative equity to cope with as well as a lack of buyers and difficulty meeting moving costs.

The figures show the majority of property vendors in this situation have been stuck on the property ladder for over 12 months.
Some will have had children in the intervening time and feel that they are stuck in unsuitable accommodation.

22% now believe that it is harder to move up the housing ladder than to get on it in the first place.

According to Lloyds TSB’s report,
• 61% of second steppers have wanted to climb up the ladder in the past 12 months but have been unable to do so as they face an increasing number of challenges.
• 22% believe it is now harder to move up the ladder than get on it in the first place.
• 43% also feel it will be as equally difficult.

Stephen Noakes, mortgage director of Lloyds TSB said: “First-time sellers are now faced with some very tough challenges when trying to make their next move on the property ladder and many are finding it more difficult than getting on the ladder in the first place. It is vital that this group of home movers receive more support and attention as they play an intrinsic role in getting the housing market moving again.”

A recent study by HSBC also found that as many as 360,000 home owners are unable to move up the property ladder thanks to a combination of sliding house prices and more restrictive lending rules.

Those who bought properties in 2007 before the housing crash do not now have sufficient equity in their homes to trade up to larger properties, according to new research by HSBC.

Although most are not yet in negative equity, they do not hold enough of their home’s value to cover the required 10% deposit on a new property and pay associated moving costs, such as stamp duty, agent fees and legal expenses.

The problem has been exacerbated because the price of many first time properties has fallen faster than the rest of the housing market.

Demand from first time buyers has waned since lenders pulled out of the 100% mortgage market.

Mortgage lenders now require buyers to put down at least a 10% deposit, and even then these borrowers will be charged a higher mortgage interest rate than those borrowing 75% of a property’s value.

Peter Dockar, the head of mortgages at HSBC, said: “Those who have bought their first home can no longer rely on rising house prices to provide them with the deposit they need for their second.”

Tagged with:
 

There Will Never Be A Better Time To Invest In Property

MyPropertyPowerTeam.co.uk helps property investors and landlords build their own property power team to enable them to profit from property - Visit our main site now!