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Tenancies Reform Bill Fails On Technicality

Tenancies Reform Bill Fails On Technicality

Tenancies Reform Bill Fails On Technicality

UK private rental sector (PRS) and social landlords were able to breathe a sigh of relief on Friday 28th November 2014, when the controversial Revenge Eviction Bill, or to use its correct title, the Tenancies Reform Bill, presented by Lib Dem MP Sarah Teather, failed to progress past its first reading in the House of Commons.

Rather than failing on a vote, the bill failed on a technicality after MP’s Philip Davies and Christopher Chope chose to talk it out, known as filibustering, because there were not enough MP’s present in the House of Commons to vote for the Bill. The debate started at approximately 9.30am and parliamentary procedure dictates that only Bills which remain unopposed after 2.30pm may make further progress.

MP’s who supported the Bill tried bringing forward a closure motion, to end the debate and call for an early vote, however for a successful majority, at least 100 MP’s must support it, but the motion was only supported by 60 MP’s and the debate on the Bill subsequently ended.

In order for the Tenancies Reform Bill to become law by the next election it must pass a second reading stage in the House of Commons, but it is not certain whether the Government will commit more parliamentary time to debate the Tenancies Reform Bill to try to force it through.

UK PRS and social tenants do need to be protected from the small minority of rogue landlords, and so do good, reliable, law abiding landlords.

It is far from fair that the majority of upstanding landlords should be expected to alter legal business practices because of criticism drawn by a few rogue operators within the UK’s private rented sector.

The Tenancies (Reform) Bill proposed restrictions on the serving of section 21 notices even where only a “hazard awareness notice” has been issued by a council. Landlords wouldl also be prevented from serving a section 21 notice where an improvement notice has been served on a rental property relating to category 1 or category 2 Hazards under the HHSRS rating system, or where the rental property requires emergency remedial action.

Tenants would also be able to challenge section 21 notices where they had complained to the landlord or council before the notice was issued, but the council was still deciding whether to even inspect the property in question.

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Chancellor Insists Help-To-Buy scheme Is Part Of A Healthy Property Market

Chancellor Insists Help-To-Buy scheme Is Part Of A Healthy Property Market

Chancellor insists that 95% mortgages underwritten by Government are Part Of A Healthy Property Market

The Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne has hailed the wider recovery of the UK’s economy and taken a swipe at the critics of his housing policies, insisting that large home loans are part of a “healthy market” and “aspirational society”.

Several Government schemes have been announced since the start of the year aimed to get banks and mortgage lenders to increase both the availability and affordability of mortgages in the UK.

The Government’s Help-To-Buy scheme has been the most controversial, because the Government underwrites high loan-to-value (LTV) mortgages, removing some of the risk from mortgage lenders, enabling them to offer cheaper mortgage loans to borrowers who only have small value deposits.

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MP’s Table New Proposals To Regulate Private Lettings Market

MP’s Table New Proposals To Regulate Private Lettings Market

Two new proposals have been individually tabled by Labour MP’s calling for the regulation of landlords and lettings agents.

Former Labour housing minister John Healey and veteran Labour backbencher, Sir Alan Meale, made the proposals in the House of Commons separately but both are calling for better regulation of the private rental sector

Mr Healey’s Bill seeks to introduce mandatory licensing for lettings and property managing agents and a ban on lettings agents charging fees and is called “The Letting Agents (Competition, Choice and Standards) Bill 2013-14”.

The objective of the proposal is to establish a national mandatory licensing scheme for lettings and managing agents, with established standards and redress for landlords, tenants and leaseholders, and prohibition of lettings and management agent fees; to enable local authorities to administer and enforce the scheme; to require that tenants, landlords and leaseholders have written agreements; and to empower local authorities, either alone or in partnership, to trade as letting and managing agents.”

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Even MP's Think Landlord Immigration Checks Are Unworkable

Even MP’s Think Landlord Immigration Checks Are Unworkable

MP’s Question Immigration Checks By Landlords

The Governments plan to make private rented sector (PRS) and social housing landlords legally responsible for checking the immigration status of all tenant applicants has raised questions on the policy from MP’s.

The proposal to make landlords perform immigration checks on tenants and prosecute those who fail to comply has caused outrage among UK PRS landlords, who would be expected to be doing the UK Border Agency’s work without payment.

Following the outline of the new proposals, Shadow Home Secretary, Yvette Cooper, a former housing minister, told the House of Commons during a lively debate on the Queens speech that landlords performing immigration checks on tenants would be unworkable, stating that: “The Government cannot tell us how their policy will be enforced, because they do not know who the landlords are and they will not have a statutory register.”

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UK Housing Minister Promises No Property Purchasing Reforms

UK Housing Minister Promises No Property Purchasing Reforms

UK housing minister Mark Prisk has stated that the Government has no plan to reform the property buying process in England and Wales.

Answering a question from Welsh Tory MP Alun Cairns in the House of Commons, Mr Prisk, a former chartered surveyor, dismissed any idea that he considered the Scottish system superior.

Mr Cairns asked the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (CLG) what consideration the department had given to reforming the residential property purchase system; and what assessment had been made of the same process in Scotland.

Mr Prisk replied that there were no current plans to change the current residential property buying and selling system in England and Wales, where properties are sold ‘subject to contract’.

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