Currently viewing the tag: "help to buy scheme"
Demand For High Risk Mortgages Reaches New High

Demand For High Risk Mortgages Reaches New High

More property buyers with small deposits are taking out high risk loans worth over 3.5 times their take home income

The number of residential property buyers who can only raise a small deposit of less than 10%, and who don’t qualify for the Government’s Help To Buy scheme, are taking out high risk loans worth over 3.5 times their take home income, has risen to its highest level for over five years.

New figures published by the Bank of England (BoE) show that the number of high risk mortgages being taken out by property investors and existing landlords has increased in the first three months of 2014.

Mortgage lending to new borrowers who had less than a 10% deposit and a Loan-To-Income (LTI) multiple of more than 3.5 times a single person income, or 2.75 times for joint income borrowers, has increased to 2.6%, the highest recorded figure since the last quarter of 2008.

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Help-To-Buy Scheme Could Threaten UK Housing Market

Help-To-Buy Scheme Could Threaten UK Housing Market

The Help To Buy Scheme Could Be Scaled Back Amid Concerns That The UK Property Market Could Be Heading
For Another Property Bubble

George Osborne, the Chancellor of the Exchequer has said that the Bank of England are being vigilant on UK house price rises and they would intervene if the situation becomes necessary.

The Chancellor’s comments come after the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) warned that the booming UK property market could threaten the economic recovery of the country.

Possible action could include reigning back the Government’s Help-To-Buy scheme, which enables people with only a small deposit to take out a mortgage.

In a report the OECD said that “The UK should introduce measures to address the risks of excessive house price inflation, as property values now significantly exceed long-term averages relative to rents and household incomes. Access to the Help to Buy scheme should be tightened, and buyers should be required to put down bigger deposits for mortgages”.

In response to the report, Mr Osborne said: “I’ve said we should be vigilant about the housing market and this Government has given the Bank of England the power and the tools to do what they felt needed to be done to help to contribute to building a resilient economy in an independent way”.

The Help to Buy scheme enables the Government to place a second charge on properties purchased under the scheme, allowing them to have some degree of profitability and allow them a small degree of control over the UK property market.

People buying property worth up to £600,000 (GBP) using a deposit of just 5% may be grateful of the Government’s help but many fail to realise the full implications of the scheme, or spot the Government tactic of controlling properties.

The Government either top up the purchasers 5% deposit with 20% of the property’s value or it will underwrite a portion of the debt allowing lenders to advance purchasers with high loan-to-value mortgages that the Government guarantee.

The £600,000 (GBP) upper limit of the Help-To-Buy scheme has been widely criticised for being too high, however, recent figures show that the average cost of a property bought using the scheme was just £148,000 (GBP).

Concerns are rife that another property bubble may be formed in the UK property market following a continuing run of positive house price trends.

Mortgage lender, Nationwide recently reported that property values had risen by 10.9% during the last 12 months, the first time annual house price inflation has reached double figures since April 2010.

Data from the Land Registry also shows that average property prices in London have already surpassed the previous 2007 peak.

Recent property price increases have caused the typical average cost of residential property in the UK to rise to £262,770 (GBP), according to Zoopla.

New regulations to control borrowing were introduced at the end of April 2014 to ensure prospective property owners are not risking taking on too much debt.

Under the Mortgage Market Review, lenders are required to carry out stringent affordability checks, including making sure borrowers can continue to meet the mortgage repayments if and when interest rates rise.

However, data on the number of mortgage approvals for residential property purchases appear to suggest that the market may be moderating, with the Bank of England reporting a dip in loan approvals for the second consecutive month during March 2014.

New Data Shows Residential Property Prices Are Still Climbing

New Data Shows Residential Property Prices Are Still Climbing

New Data Shows Residential Property Prices
Are Still Climbing

UK property prices are continuing to increase across all UK regions, according to the latest data published by the mortgage lender, Halifax.

The latest data gathered in a survey by the Halifax for February 2014, shows that residential property prices increased by 2.4% during the month, making average property prices 7.9% higher than they were in February 2013.

The growth in UK residential property prices over the last 12 months is the fastest annual pace of increase since October 2007 and means an average residential property in the UK now costs around £179,872 (GBP).

Residential house prices are increasing because of improving economic conditions in the UK and increased demand from frustrated buyers, encouraged by the Government’s Help-To-Buy scheme offering first-time and next-step buyers cheaper mortgages.

A recent poll of 27 economists and analysts by news agency, Reuters suggested that residential property prices could increase by another 7% this year, led by activity in the London property market.

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Mortgage Lenders Worried Help-To-Buy Will Distort UK Property Market

Mortgage Lenders Worried Help-To-Buy Will Distort UK Property Market

Help-To-Buy Controversy Continues

The latest figures released by the popular property finding portal, Rightmove.co.uk coincide with the news that UK based mortgage lenders are worried that the second phase of the Government’s Help-To-Buy scheme risks distorting the true health of the UK property market.

The British Bankers Association (BBA) is a governing body that represents all the banks that are currently participating in the scheme including those who are planning to participate in it in the future, has called for Government clarification on the proposed exit strategy from the Help-To-Buy scheme, according to a report in the Daily Telegraph.The news comes just 2 weeks before the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne’s Autumn Statement on 5th December.

In a submission to HM Treasury, the BBA said, “Some members of the BBA are participating in the Government’s Help-To-Buy scheme, but further clarification is needed on exit strategies.”

Mortgage applications worth £365 Million (GBP) have been received since the second phase of the Help-To-Buy scheme was launched on 1st October 2013, to help aspiring home buyers get a foot on the property ladder.

The Royal Bank of Scotland, NatWest, Halifax and Bank of Scotland started offering residential mortgages under the umbrella of the Help-To-Buy scheme last month and mortgage lenders representing most of the UK mortgage market have confirmed they will eventually come on board, in order to capture a share of the market.

The Government initiative makes it easier for mainstream mortgage lenders to offer higher value mortgages with deposits as low as 5% by removing some of the risk they would face if the borrower defaults on repayments, because the mortgage products are underwritten by the Government as Spotlight has previously reported.

The Government are very happy to be underwriting Help-To-Buy mortgages because they are listed as a second charge on the mortgage, increasing the Governments property assets, allowing them to borrow money against their portion of the residential properties purchased under the Help-To-Buy scheme.

At least property investors enter the property market with an exit strategy in mind, but the Government have yet to reveal how they intend to exit from the property market when the scheme ends. No wonder mortgage companies are worried!

Help-To-Buy scheme Is The Deal Of The Century For The Government Government Say Help-To-Buy Scheme Is Creating

 75 New Homeowners A Day

The Prime Minister, David Cameron has been defending the controversial Help-To-Buy scheme, stating publicly that the scheme is creating up to 75 new homeowners a day.

Over 2,000 first-time buyers have made offers on properties using the scheme and the Prime Minister is rubbing his hands with glee because there is a dark secret behind the incentive.

More than £369 Million (GBP) has been lent to new home owners, making the loan figures average £155,000 (GBP) per person. Wages will likely rise with inflation and so will mortgage rates, doing little for the financial security of working homeowners who will be trying hard to pay off the percentage stake in their property that is owed to the Government.

Mr Cameron insisted that the state-backed loans are helping hard working responsible people purchase residential property to live in, and he also dismissed fears over a new housing bubble and taxpayers helping the wealthy middle-classes as nonsense.

What he did not say was what the prospects are likely to be, for people buying property now using the Help-To-Buy scheme, in a few years time.

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Help-To-Buy Scheme not bad news for property investors

Help-To-Buy Scheme not bad news for property investors

Why The Help-To-Buy Scheme
Is Not Bad News For Property Investors!

The Help-To-Buy scheme may not be open to property investors for rental property purchases, but the scheme does have some good points.

From 7th October 2013, first-time buyers and existing property owners are now eligible to buy property with a 5% deposit as part of the new Mortgage Guarantee Help-To-Buy scheme.

The scheme was originally launched for new build properties at the start of 2013, with the resale portion set to launch in January 2014, however lenders can begin writing loans through the Help-To-Buy scheme from October 7th 2013, but they will not be able to purchase the Government guarantee that underpins these mortgage loans until January 2014.

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Property Prices Increase As New Houses Built

Property Prices Increase As New Houses Built

Property Prices Increase As New Houses Built

On Tuesday, it was revealed that the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), said 21% of its members had reported an increased workload during the second quarter of the year.

The poll, the most upbeat since the start of 2007, indicated that the reported recovery of the UK property market was widespread, with surveyors in almost all of the UK’s regions and industry sub-sectors becoming busier.

The best-performing regions were London and the South West, often referred to as the driving force behind the UK property market, while the worst region was Northern Ireland, the only part of the UK where RICS surveyors continue to see their workload shrink.

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Help To Buy Scheme Could Cause New Property Bubble

Help To Buy Scheme Could Cause New Property Bubble

Critics Warn Help To Buy Scheme Will Cause New Property Bubble

The Chancellor of the Exchequer has launched the second phase of the ‘Help to Buy’ scheme and laid out the terms of a programme that will underwrite UK residential property purchases up to the value of £600,000 (GBP) following a meeting with mortgage lenders and house-builders.

A number of groups, however, have warned that, if this scheme is allowed to drive up house prices in the UK, it will cause another property ‘bubble’ and encourage people to take on huge mortgages.

George Osborne is hopeful that the terms of the scheme will prevent another property bubble, as there are now strict income checks and other lending criteria imposed by mortgage lenders and the loan scheme will not be allowed to be used by purchasers to acquire second homes.

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Government Help To Buy Scheme Set To Boost

Property Ownership

40% Of Trapped Tenants Could Become First Time Buyers With Help To Buy Scheme

40% Of Trapped Tenants Could Become First Time Buyers With Help To Buy Scheme

Almost 40% of tenants trying to escape being part of Generation Rent could become homebuyers when the Governments 95% Help to Buy scheme is implemented in January 2014.

New research released by Rightmove found that very few trapped renters, tenants who would like to buy but can’t afford to, are currently saving for a deposit.

39% of tenants feel they will never be able to become property owners unless they strike it rich, which Rightmove reckon could come in the form of the Government’s Help to Buy scheme, which will enable people with only a 5% deposit to get on the housing ladder.

The research, conducted among 3,214 current private rental sector (PRS) tenants, last month, between April 9th and April 25th, shows that while 42% of trapped tenants are trying to save for a deposit, currently less than 10% of tenants are on course to meet their deposit goal , with the majority not in a position to start saving.

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Average Residential Property will cost

 £267,000 by 2018

Average UK Residential Property Prices Increase

Average UK Residential Property Prices Increase

Average UK residential property prices for 2014

are estimated to be 2.3% higher than in 2007

Forecasts from the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) suggest that a typical residential property in the UK will cost an average of £227,000 (GBP) in 2014, overtaking the average peak price of residential property observed at the height of the housing bubble in 2007, for the first time.

The CEBR also predict that the average residential property price will be £222,000 (GBP) by the end of this year, 1.4% higher than average property prices reached in 2012.

By 2018, the CEBR expect the cost of a typical residential property in the UK to average £267,000 (GBP).

In 2014, the CEBR estimate that the Government’s Help-to-Buy scheme could raise UK property prices by up to 0.8% without having any appreciable impact on the current housing supply.

However, if the upward trend in residential property prices continues, it could lead to an additional 4,800 residential properties being built in 2015.

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