Currently viewing the tag: "fees"
NLA Publishes Landlords At A Glance Guide To Voting

NLA Publishes Landlords At A Glance Guide To Voting

NLA Makes It Easier For Landlords To Vote
With At A Glance Guide To Main Political Party Manifestos

The National Landlords Association (NLA) have decided to make it a bit easier for floating landlord voters who may not have decided who they intend to vote for yet, by compiling a short at a glance guide to where each political party stands on key policies related to property ownership in the UK private rental sector and landlord life.
As we published on Spotlight yesterday, every political party have their own views on each of the following measures:

  • Rent Control
  • Longer Tenancies
  • Landlord Licensing
  • Landlords’ Register
  • Letting Agent Fees
  • Landlord Tax

Tomorrow is polling day in the UK (7th May), so if you haven’t already decided which of the political parties should get your vote as a landlord and business owner, the National Landlords Association has decided to make it a bit easier for floating landlord voters by compiling a helpful guide to where each of the main political parties stand on key landlord and property related policies.

Continue reading »

More Details Emerge On Government Demand For Transparency Over Letting Agent Fees

More Details Emerge On Government Demand For Transparency Over Letting Agent Fees

More Details Emerge From Government
On Letting Agent Fees Debate

The Government have declared that all UK letting agents and property management agents must display full details of all fees charged to tenants on websites and in offices.

Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg faced a tough grilling at his House Of Commons session from Labour MP Harriet Harman, who wanted the Government to back the ban on letting agents charging fees to tenants.

Ms Harman told MPs: “Not least because of the difficulties of affording to buy a home, there are now 9 million people renting, including 1.3 million families with children – security and continuity are particularly important for them. It is time to move from one-year tenancies with unpredictable rents to three-year tenancies with predictable rents. What we need to be sure is that letting agents do not rip tenants off by charging fees to the tenants, as well as charging the landlords.”

Continue reading »

Government Want Transparency Over Letting Agent Fees

Government Want Transparency Over Letting Agent Fees

Government Plan For Transparency Of Letting Agent Fees
Welcomed By Landlords

The Government announced last week that they intend to improve the transparency of fees charged by letting and property management agents as called for by the Residential Landlords Association (RLA).

The move comes after the Labour party’s general election posturing early last week by attempting to seek an amendment to the Consumer Rights Bill, ending charges paid by tenants to letting and property management agents,

Whilst the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) currently only requires letting and property management agents to list compulsory charges to the tenant upfront in advertisements, proposals announced on Tuesday 13th May 2014 will require letting agents to publish full details of all fees charged, on websites and prominently displayed in their offices.

Continue reading »

Mortgage Lending Up £1.7 Billion (GBP)

Mortgage Lending Up £1.7 Billion (GBP)

UK Mortgage Lending Up £1.7 Billion (GBP)

The latest mortgage lending figures released by the Bank of England show that lending secured on residential property increased by £1.7 Billion (GBP) in December 2013, compared to the average monthly increase of £1.1Billion (GBP) observed during the previous six months of the year.

The increase is generally being credited to the success of the Government’s Help-To-Buy scheme, with London leading the way on residential property price rises, but what is the real situation affecting the UK?

Director of e.surv chartered surveyors, Richard Sexton, explained: “Mortgage lending in the UK is improving at lightning-speed. Lending has hit a six year high, as banks continue to offer cheap loans and interest rates, and repayments remain low. Mortgage lenders have dramatically increased lending to borrowers with smaller deposits, which has encouraged more first-time buyers to the market. And the government’s Help-To-Buy scheme has given consumers a huge confidence boost, which has increased lending volumes further. But the heart of the market remains in London and the South East. In other areas of the country the recovery is far slower. House prices may be increasing quickly, particularly in the capital, but it’s important not to withdraw Help-To-Buy too soon. In London, buyers need the scheme to get on the ladder. In many other areas, wage growth has been comatose since the economic crash, would-be property buyers simply don’t have enough income to save for a deposit. Building more houses would be a far more prudent approach to capping price rises than trimming down the Help-To-Buy scheme prematurely.”

Continue reading »

Tenants Charter Proposals For Longer Tenancies Breach Mortgage Lenders Current Buy-To-Let Mortgage Terms

Tenants Charter Proposals For Longer Tenancies Breach Mortgage Lenders Current Buy-To-Let Mortgage Terms

Industry welcome to weak tenants’ charter that could see UK PRS landlords at odds with

Buy-To-Let Mortgage Lenders

The new tenants’ charter was announced by the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (CLG), Eric Pickles, last Wednesday, allowing tenants to ask for longer tenancies and better transparency of letting agents’ fees.

The new tenants’ charter will also aim to force all lettings and property managing agents controlling PRS rental properties to join a compulsory redress scheme.

The Tenants’ Charter, published for consultation, outlines what tenants should be looking out for at every stage when renting a property in the UK’s private rented sector, including lettings agents having to inform customers what all their fees are upfront, before they have committed to anything, including visiting a property.

However, the introduction of these terms under the banner of the tenants’ charter could threaten the business future of large numbers of landlords who would technically be in breach of the strict buy-to-let mortgage terms imposed by many mortgage lenders, which generally stipulate that tenancy agreements are to be for a period of no more than one year.

Secretary Of State For Communities & Local Government, Eric Pickles

Secretary Of State For Communities & Local Government, Eric Pickles

Mr Pickles stated that the Government intend to publish a code of practice setting standards for the management of property in the private rental sector (PRS) along with guidance setting out the role of public bodies in protecting tenants from illegal eviction.

Mr Pickles said: “This government is on the side of hardworking people and the last thing we want to do is hurt tenants and kill (property) investment by increasing costs and strangling the sector with red tape. But tenants deserve better value for money, and dodgy landlords should be under no illusion they can provide a shoddy service with impunity. These proposals will raise the quality and choice of rental accommodation, root out the cowboys and rogue operators in the sector, and give tenants the confidence to request longer fixed-term, family-friendly tenancies that meet their needs”

Mr Pickles also said that the Government will develop a model tenancy agreement which will clearly set out the rights and responsibilities of tenants and landlords, and ensure families can benefit from longer tenancies, without changing the existing legal framework for the rental market. He said “Longer tenancies will give families greater certainty and security, especially for those with children at school, and reduce costs for both tenants and landlords who will not have to pay letting agents to arrange frequent contract renewals.”

Clive Betts MP, Chair of the Communities and Local Government Committee said: “I am pleased that the Government has embraced many of the recommendations in our private rented sector report. The proposals for a tenants’ charter and model tenancy agreements reflect our calls for greater awareness of rights and responsibilities. Far too often the security needed by families is not being provided by the private rented sector. I am pleased, therefore, that the Government has listened to what the Committee said about the need for more family friendly tenancies. It is also welcome that the Government is taking forward our proposal to allow rent and housing benefit to be clawed back when landlords have been convicted of letting out dangerous property. The Committee will be watching closely to ensure that they are translated into action. We will also press to ensure that the Government’s gathering of information on selective licensing leads to action to raise standards. Much remains to be done if renting is to become an attractive alternative to owner occupation. It is disappointing; therefore, that the Government does not see fit to crack down on cowboy letting agents and their rip off fees and charges. It is also regrettable that the Government has declined to give local authorities the powers and freedom they need to improve housing in their areas.”

Tenants Charter Proposals For Longer Tenancies Breach Mortgage Lenders Current
Buy-To-Let Mortgage Terms

Property professionals generally agree with the introduction of the new tenants’ charter but many think that the Government have sidestepped the opportunity to enforce much tighter regulation of landlords in the private rental sector and lettings and property managing agents in particular and many feel that the new measures fall short of what is really needed.

It will be interesting to see if the Government put pressure on the banks and mainstream mortgage lenders to abolish or ignore such limiting clauses, allowing them to deliver on the real aim of the tenants’ charter.

Caroline Kenny, an executive of the UK Association of Letting Agents (UKALA) wants the Government to build on the experience and expertise of those industry bodies which already require higher standards of their members. Commenting “Responsible agents who choose to belong to professional bodies which require client money protection insurance, impartial redress and an adherence to a strict Code of Practice are forced to compete with those who show little regard to professional standards or the needs of their clients. UKLA believe that this package of proposals represents a missed opportunity for the Government to make mandatory the kind of comprehensive protection offered by the UK Association of Letting Agents and other industry regulatory bodies, which are called UKALA & NLAfor by those working in the property industry and needed by hardworking consumers who are unable to differentiate between good and bad letting agents.”

Richard Lambert, Chief Executive of the National Landlords Association (NLA), said: “The NLA has long argued that private renting can be far more flexible than commonly perceived, and we need to tap into this potential to meet the changing needs and expectations of those who rent. We look forward to working with government to make a success of these proposals. However, we believe that the Government has missed an opportunity to require greater professionalism of letting agents. While the requirement to belong to an approved redress scheme is a step in the right direction, it does little to protect the financial interest of landlords and tenants working with unregulated agents.”

Residential Landlords Association

Join The Residential Landlords Association

Alan Ward, Chairman of the Residential Landlords Association (RLA) welcomed the Government action to improve tenants’ understanding of their rights and responsibilities saying: “Tenants take more trouble buying a second-hand car than renting a house” Ensuring that tenants and landlords each understand clearly their rights and obligations to one another ensures a balanced relationship and enables them to hold each other to account based on the large number of laws already in existence. It will also play a vital role in rooting out those willfully criminal landlords who reap misery on tenants. We look forward to working with Ministers on the Charter as well as on how to best get this information to tenants.”

RICSPeter Bolton King, RICS global residential director, said “The long overdue announcement was definitely a step in the right direction. The lettings sector has for far too long been the Wild West of the property industry, with many tenants having absolutely nowhere to go should they wish to complain about shoddy service. The introduction of a code of practice specifically covering those managing rented property should certainly improve standards.”

Chief Executive of the Housing & Homelessness charity Shelter, Campbell Robb said “This announcement is recognition that current private renting arrangements are not fit for families with children, who need greater long-term stability. This is a welcome step in the right direction, and ministers now need to consider how to make longer tenancies a real choice for the families desperate for a more stable place to live.”

The announcement of the new Tenants’ Charter was good news for consumer champions, Which? Who have been campaigning since 2007 when they first called for an amendment to the Consumers, Estate Agents and Redress Act 2007 requiring letting agents to join an approved complaints scheme, just as property sales agents are. The consumer groups investigations also discovered earlier this year that major letting agents are acting unlawfully by not being upfront about the fees charged to clients.

The Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013, looks set to be implemented in Spring 2014, giving all landlords and tenants access to a complaints scheme. This will mean that 40% of agents who currently aren’t signed up to a redress scheme will have to become members

Which? Executive Director, Richard Lloyd, said: “Renting is now the only housing option for millions so we’re pleased to see the Government taking steps to address problems in the lettings market. Making charges clear upfront will enable people to shop around more easily, and longer tenancies could mark the end of unnecessary renewal fees. The new legislation giving landlords and tenants access to a complaints scheme now needs to be brought in as soon as possible and there must be strong action taken against any agent in breach of the scheme.”

  • Do you think the proposals go far enough?

Take our Poll on the Tenants Charter or leave a comment below!

[yop_poll id=”2″]

More Red Tape For LandlordsRed Tape Increases For Private Sector Landlords
Despite Government Promises

Despite numerous promises to reduce the amount of red tape property professionals had to deal with, there are now even more legal requirements to let and manage rental properties.

The coalition Government started an initiative called the Red Tape Challenge, aiming to reduce the time and associated financial costs incurred by businesses and consumers in complying with unnecessary legislation.

However, recent Government announcements will increase the amount of red tape and infuriating processes that landlords and letting agents have to deal with

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) say there are currently over 100 national regulations governing the letting of a rental property in the private rental sector.

Continue reading »

MP’s Table New Proposals To Regulate Private Lettings Market

MP’s Table New Proposals To Regulate Private Lettings Market

Two new proposals have been individually tabled by Labour MP’s calling for the regulation of landlords and lettings agents.

Former Labour housing minister John Healey and veteran Labour backbencher, Sir Alan Meale, made the proposals in the House of Commons separately but both are calling for better regulation of the private rental sector

Mr Healey’s Bill seeks to introduce mandatory licensing for lettings and property managing agents and a ban on lettings agents charging fees and is called “The Letting Agents (Competition, Choice and Standards) Bill 2013-14”.

The objective of the proposal is to establish a national mandatory licensing scheme for lettings and managing agents, with established standards and redress for landlords, tenants and leaseholders, and prohibition of lettings and management agent fees; to enable local authorities to administer and enforce the scheme; to require that tenants, landlords and leaseholders have written agreements; and to empower local authorities, either alone or in partnership, to trade as letting and managing agents.”

Continue reading »

New Row Over Letting Agent's Evil Fees

New Row Over Letting Agent’s Evil Fees

Homeless Charity Wants All
Letting Agent Fees To Be Met By Landlords

The homelessness charity, Shelter have started to campaign to get all letting agent fees currently charged to tenants banned throughout England, and they want landlords to foot the bill for it, a point which has angered the Residential Landlords Association (RLA) and caused consternation with the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA) and the UK Association of Letting Agents (UKALA).

Shelter have launched a new report, “Letting Agencies: the Price you Pay”, claiming that charging landlords is a fairer way of doing business and the charity also claim that tenants are having to go without food or heating to meet increasing housing costs because letting agents’ fees are out of control.

Shelter were instrumental in getting letting agent fees banned in Scotland and now want the practice outlawed by MPs in England and are calling for politicians to take action.

The homelessness charity seem to think that all letting agents are the devil in disguise and recently questioned 58 separate letting agents throughout England, anonymously, asking them about what fees each charged in order to set up a tenancy for a tenant and discovered the average administration fee charged by agents was £350 (GBP) plus upfront rent and tenancy deposits. Less than a third of letting agents questioned charged fees totalling more than £400 and seven charged in excess of £700.

The Shelter research claims that in the last three years,

Continue reading »

Buy-To-Let Mortgage Lending Up 20% Over The Last Year

Buy-To-Let Mortgage Lending Up 20% Over The Last Year

UK Buy-to-let mortgage lending has increased by 20% year-on-year during 2012 to reach its highest level since the UK property crash of 2008.

The appetite for buy-to-let mortgages has been boosted by strong demand from frustrated first time buyers, who end up as tenants as they are unable to get themselves on the property ladder. This strong tenant demand has in turn pushed up private rented sector rental prices as tenants find that they have become financially trapped.

£16.4 Billion (GBP) worth of buy-to-let mortgages have been taken out over the last year, showing a 19% annual increase, the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) said.

Around £4.6 Billion (GBP) worth of buy-to-let mortgages were advanced in the last three months of 2012, representing a 10% increase on the previous quarter.

Continue reading »

There Will Never Be A Better Time To Invest In Property

MyPropertyPowerTeam.co.uk helps property investors and landlords build their own property power team to enable them to profit from property - Visit our main site now!