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7 Property Investment Top Tips and The “No-Money-Left-In” Secret!

7 Property Investment Top Tips and The “No-Money-Left-In” Secret!

Finally Someone Is Prepared To Tell The Truth
About Property Investment!

Would be property investors COULD pay thousands of pounds to attend a property investment seminar, but you would still NEVER learn the basics as thoroughly as this!

It’s like having a multimillionaire expert property investor explain his entire property investment strategy to you over lunch (without worrying about the bill)

Because this unedited and uncensored property investment document explains how you can cash in on the Buy-To-Let Property Boom right now, even if you’ve never bought a property before… or never thought you could!


 The Buy Refurbish Remortgage Blueprint – The “No-Money-Left-In” Secret [PDF]

It’s the kind of straight-to-the-point explanation EVERY property investment beginner wants and searches for, but is (deliberately) difficult to find!

Now the secrets of profiting from property investment are accessible to everyone…

And a Property Investor’s Masterclass, fully detailed with accurate examples, is now available in a concise, easy-to-read PDF Document.

These 2 expert property investment authors are offering you a copy here, without charge:

 The Buy Refurbish Remortgage Blueprint – The “No-Money-Left-In” Secret [PDF]

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Owning Property Is Better For Financial Security

Owning Property Is Better For Financial Security

Mortgage Payments Vs Savings: Property Provides Better Returns Over Traditional Saving Methods

There was a report in the Daily Express last week that said property owners have saved more than others with traditional savings accounts and ISA’s.

The report reckoned that the Bank of England’s record low interest rate has saved property owners almost £20,000 (GBP) over the last six years in inflated mortgage payments. However traditional savers have lost out by almost the same amount, prompting calls for more help for savers and warnings that borrowing could create a new debt crisis.

Bank of England statistics reveal that the record low interest rate of 0.5%, reached 5 years ago today, has been a mixed blessing for the UK.

Interest rates started to tumble back in 2008 and by March 2009 the Bank of England’s base rate had reached 0.5%, promoting cheaper borrowing.

Property owners with a £100,000 Standard Variable Rate (SVR) mortgage could have saved almost £20,000 (GBP), because mortgage payments were around £3,300 (GBP) a year lower than they were in early 2008 before the financial crash ended the previous property boom.

Savers with £100,000 (GBP) in cash ISAs lost around £18,500 (GBP) over the same period.

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Green Deal Is A Joke

Green Deal Is A Joke

Bad Business Practices, Long Term Debts, Unqualified assessors – Green Deal getting bad press

The Government heralded the launch of the “Green Deal” in January this year as a groundbreaking flagship initiative that would help struggling families cut energy bills, however, it appears that the general public are 99.9% against the idea.

The intention of the Government was to encourage millions of UK home owners to take out “Green Deal” loans in order to pay for money saving improvements to properties, such as; loft insulation, double glazing, boilers and other energy efficient measures with the aim of cutting a typical family’s energy costs by as much as £50 a month.

The loan would be repaid over an agreed timescale of up to 25 years, but the debt is attached to the property rather than the current owner, which means the debt could be passed on to any new buyer. As a result, property vendors could face demands from prospective buyers to clear any outstanding debt, which could also see them facing a charge or early repayment penalty of up to £6,000 (GBP).

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Property Investment Truths

Property Investment Truths

Report Reveals Property Investment Truths

You may already know that sometimes life can get tough.

You can get in a real pickle with finances and barely have a penny to your name in order to get by.

Even professional property investors know this because when some of them started their property journey they were in £30,000 (GBP) credit card debt. – Rob Moore – Progressive Property

You see, Rob had hardly had any money and the credit card debt was compounding

So what did Rob do?

He thought about giving up, thinking that he can’t invest in property. (Expensive word that).

Rob knows many successful property investors are still in the making and if you’ve had any challenges along the way, then you can relate to what Rob is saying so stay with it, or don’t and just humour him.

Within 3 months of meeting his business partner Mark Homer, Rob bought 20 properties within the first year, and Rob was out of debt.

All from just one joint venture partnership.

Rob doesn’t think of himself as anything special, and he was certainly no property expert at the time, as Mark had most of the knowledge back then

Anyone who doesn’t know Rob & Mark might say that their success was all because of the boom years.

Actually Rob & Mark bought their first 20 properties pre crash and they are their worst 20, and not because they didn’t buy well. The crash that hurt so many people was the biggest guardian angel they could have hoped for.

But they were prepared already.

So what can you do?

You may be smart and decisive, but you may have challenges which are temporarily holding you and your property investment career back.

Download Your FREE copy of The 2013 State Of The Property Market Address PDF

Rob knows that investors need to get educated before we get out there to network and meet people. That’s why he is giving away controversial insider secrets to property investors who want to have the edge.

Download Your FREE copy of The 2013 State Of The Property Market Address PDF

If you have knowledge and you come across a great property deal, and the figures stack, you will be able to get the money – from other people!

You will always get challenges. You won’t get rich quick by investing in property – it is not a sit-on-a-Beach-drinking-Pina-Colada-in-Marbella-and-come-back-a-millionaire instant results.

I know you know this too.

You see, it’s survival of the fittest right now, and for those without the stomach for it, it’s hard.

So the best thing for property investors to do is get educated, and getting inside information on the real state of the property market could give you the edge.

Download Your FREE copy of The 2013 State Of The Property Market Address PDF

Successful professional property investors have knowledge and courage, they make decisions and take action, the money that the helpless masses are losing is up for grabs, and there’s more of it than ever.

You just need to know where to look!

 

2013 State Of The Property Market Address

2013 State Of The Property Market Address

Download Your FREE copy of The 2013 State Of The Property Market Address PDF

 Mortgage Approvals Fall As Demand From

Residential PropertyBuyers Fades

UK Mortgage Approvals Fall

UK Mortgage Approvals Fall

UK mortgage approvals in February 2013 have fallen to the lowest level seen for seven months according to E.surv chartered surveyors.

E.surv, reckon that only the government Funding for Lending (FLS) scheme is preventing a much steeper fall in residential property mortgage lending for purchasing, even though uptake from potential property buyers has been lower than expected.

Overall UK mortgage approvals fell by 11% in February to just 49,019,  down from 54,719 approvals recorded in January 2013, making it the lowest mortgage approval level since July 2012, according to E.surv data.

The fall in mortgage approvals comes despite a wider and cheaper range of residential mortgage products on offer, which suggests that the drop in mortgage lending was due to weakening borrower demand and not a decline in the availability of residential mortgages.

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Universal Credit Will Backfire Warns Think Tank

Government Welfare Reforms Set To Backfire As Claimants Don't Want Universal CreditThe proposed welfare reforms are not wanted by the majority of claimants or their landlords according to research by the Social Market Foundation.

Tenants with low incomes and families claiming benefit will be pushed further into financial difficulties and debt by the shift to monthly benefit payments under Iain Duncan Smith’s welfare reforms.

Attempts as part of the new Universal Credit system to encourage claimants to budget properly and make their own rental payments risk backfiring, the Social Market Foundation said.

It called for the introduction of an online budgeting tool allowing claimants to set the frequency of payments themselves and allocate income to different items of expenditure.

However the foundation stopped short of calling for landlords to continue to receive direct payments for tenants that were considered vulnerable or at risk.

Under the Universal Credit there will be one single monthly benefit payment – rather than weekly or fortnightly as at present – and all tenants will have to pay landlords themselves.

The Government says it will be “flexible” with those who struggle to manage their money.

Research by the Social Market Foundation, entitled Sink or Swim: the Impact of Universal Credit, found that most low income households were opposed to the moves, expressing fears that they would not be able to budget properly and could end up in rent arrears and even face eviction.

Nigel Keohane, the think tank’s deputy director and co-author of the report doubted whether plans by the Government to provide special arrangements for certain vulnerable individuals was adequate, stating: “The Government’s laudable aim that Universal Credit should prepare families for work, boost their resilience to financial shocks, and simplify the system is at risk of backfiring. By moving to a single monthly payment for all benefits, the Government is removing the markers and aids that families currently rely on to budget effectively. Our research shows that this will throw people in at the deep end leaving them either to sink or swim. This laissez-faire approach will create real problems not only for families themselves, but also for public service organisations, such as social and private sector landlords and childcare providers, that families will end up owing money to. Instead of mandating monthly payments and centrally planning which families to exempt, the Government should allow low income families to take the decision themselves through an online budgeting tool,” he said. “This would allow the reforms to work with the grain of wider government objectives like personal responsibility and increased financial capability rather than working against them as the current system seems set to do.”

A Department for Work and Pensions spokesperson said: “Universal Credit will be paid monthly because most people in work are paid that way and the system should help people get used to the patterns of working life. But we will make sure that no one falls through the cracks, and we are working with local authorities and the financial industry on how best to support individuals. We have always said we would be flexible with people who might struggle to manage their money.”

Hmmm…..If that last statement is true, then the DWP had better start preparing to open a separate department to deal with struggling landlords as the Universal Credit system is severely flawed and the majority of claimants don’t want direct payments because they are unable to cope at the present time, so what happens to them in 2013?

Sign the e-Petition Now!

Hi All
My property management agents were in the process of interviewing a pair of prospective tenants for one of my properties. The applicants were a homeless married couple who had been forced to relocate to the area due to losing their jobs and wanted to move to an area with better employment opportunities.

The application was going great until it came to checking the couple’s housing benefit entitlement….

According to the local authority (I wont name and shame them here for legal reasons) the married couple were only entitled to the shared room rate because they were married and under 35. The management company attempted to argue over such blatant discrimination by the local authority but the facts seemed to fall on deaf ears.

Single claimants under 35 would be entitled to receive the shared room rate in full as individuals, but because the applicants were married they only counted as a single applicant!

It has taken 4 months of hard work, stress and a great deal of legal wrangling to sort out, including requests for Discretionary Payments, consultations with LHA professionals and arguements with various Government departments.

Following tips and advice gleaned from “The Essential Landlords LHA Handbook” I have now been able to get the full 2 bed LHA rate paid directly to me and the local authority have been forced to make a grovelling apology to the tenants!

It just goes to show that when armed with the right information and legal standpoints there are always options open to landlords, and it pays to invest in the knowledge of experts!

I would like to publicly thank the LHA Expert for his brilliant LHA book and tons of helpful advice!

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UK PRS Landlords still avoiding housing benefit tenants

1/3 of Private Rental Sector Landlords Avoiding Tenants Claiming Benefits

A new Government report has revealed a growing concern about UK landlords, as an increasing percentage are now refusing to accept applications from tenants claiming housing benefits.

The situation regarding LHA tenants is set to get much worse, following the recent statements made by UK Prime Minister David Cameron and his party’s vision for further welfare reform. Read full story

The Government commissioned report was compiled by the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research at Sheffield Hallam University revealed that over one third of the 1867 landlords who agreed to take part, are already actively refraining from accepting LHA tenants or are considering avoiding benefit tenants in the future.

This change in UK landlord’s perspectives has developed since the government capped housing benefit payments in April 2011, meaning that many LHA claimants are no longer able to claim the entire rental amount from the local authority.

33% of the UK landlords surveyed admitted having severe reservations concerning the reliability of payments from LHA tenants, and as a result they were either planning to or considering no longer accepting benefit claimants as tenants.

29% of landlords had already gone through the process of tenant eviction with LHA tenants or had refused to renew the tenancies of benefit claimants when they came to an end.

36% also admitted that they were experiencing increased rental arrears from LHA tenants because of the changes to benefit payment levels made last year.

Landlords can safely and legally recover rent arrears/debts from all types of tenants, including absconded tenants by using Legal 4 Landlords professional services

Welfare Reform Minister, Lord Freud, didn’t see the results of the Government commissioned report as worrying, stating that: “The research gives us an early insight into what is really happening, and it shows that the many scare stories about the effects of housing benefit reform are simply not materialising.”

If that were true, why are an increasing number of UK landlords wrongly avoiding accepting LHA tenants?
Don’t miss out on the opportunity to get regualr direct payments from any Local authority – Get “The Landlords Essential LHA Handbook” by John Paul – The LHA Expert

Help the RLA

Join The Residential Landlords Association

Details of the Government’s new procedures for the payment of universal credit have been released – and they confirm that the landlord’s right to insist on direct rent payments if a tenant is in arrears will be scrapped.

Instead, payments will be made directly to tenants and it will be up to them to pay their rents or not. The proposals will mean the end of direct payment to landlords for rent as we have known it, and the new procedures will apply across the board to local authority tenants, housing association tenants and tenants in the private rented sector.

The RLA has serious concerns about the proposals:

1. No back stop provision under which a landlord can demand payment direct.
2. Lack of clarity/much greater individual discretion in operating these rules because “guidance” replaces regulations.
3. No means of redress for landlords if things go wrong/no rights of appeal.
4. No proposal that the guidance should reflect the landlords interests to make sure that rent is paid and that a roof is kept over the head of the claimant.
5. The whole concept of trying to improve tenant’s responsibility at the cost of much greater risk to landlords with strong likelihood of significantly higher arrears.
6. Much less likelihood of landlords being willing to take on benefit claimants. This could even translate into less likelihood of a willingness to take on claimants who are in work especially part time work because the same rules will apply to them.
7. No provision for first payment of benefit direct to the landlord.
8. We have argued with DWP that there should be a right for landlords to be paid direct payments once there are six weeks arrears and also that the whole system of vulnerability should be assessed according to the tenant’s interest of keeping a roof over their head and the landlord’s interest to receive the money, as well as the public interest of making sure that the benefit is used for its intended purpose.

Richard Jones, the RLA’s policy director, said, “We strongly believe that the Government’s whole approach is flawed and although the objective of helping tenants manage their financial affairs is in isolation a laudable one, the Government has wholly failed to appreciate the consequences of this. There will be a much higher level of arrears, an unwillingness of landlords to house benefit claimants (at a time when there is huge pressure on social housing), increased unwillingness by banks to lend for this kind of property (or increased interest rate to reflect the risk), much higher levels of evictions and much greater homelessness.”

The RLA has produced a briefing note for landlords, and this can be downloaded by clicking here.

What can I do?

Further details will follow about how you can assist the RLA in opposing these proposals.#

Join the Residential Landlords Association

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In an interview with the Mail on Sunday, Prime Minister David Cameron suggested cutting housing benefit for people under the age of 25 in an attempt to claw back Millions of pounds worth of Government money

Housing benefit is paid to adults on a low income, to help them pay their rent, either to the local council, a private landlord or to a hostel.

It is currently paid to around 380,000 under-25s and scrapping their entitlement would save the government around £2 Billion (GBP) a year.

The Prime Minister suggested that the current housing benefit system is sending out “strange signals” that people are “better off not working, or working less”. It encourages people not to work and have children, but we should help people to work and have children”.

The proposed reforms to the welfare system could be presented as an effort to reduce a feeling of antipathy towards people on benefits that may exist among the general public.

Mr Cameron said that current benefits system has “led to huge resentment amongst those who pay into the system, because they feel that what they are having to work hard for, others are getting without having to put in the effort.”

He also commented that cutting housing benefit for younger people would “stop the state dragging young people into dependency”.

Downing Street said that Mr Cameron wanted to encourage a debate about welfare.

The Prime Minister is also considering proposals to set benefits at a regional level, rather than a national level, in order to reflect wide regional variations in pay.

Political analysts have suggested that Mr Cameron’s comments are part of an effort to reconnect with Conservative backbenchers who believe the party’s values are being watered down under the coalition.

Housing charity Shelter has warned that cutting housing benefit for young people could lead to an increase in homelessness.

The charity’s chief executive Campbell Robb said: “To take away housing benefit from hundreds of thousands of young people – particularly in the current economic environment where young people in particular are finding it very difficult to find jobs – would have a devastating impact on many people’s lives. I think we would see many more people ending up homeless as a result of this kind of very significant change.”

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