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What Does The Future Really Hold For PRS Landlords?

What Does The Future Really Hold For PRS Landlords?

Are PRS Landlords Any Better Off
After The Election?

UK private rental sector landlords may have breathed a sigh of relief after the general election results were announced last week, but is the future still rosy for the PRS?

Conservatives Vowed To Leave PRS Landlords AloneThe Conservatives may have been voted into Government by a small majority over the other political rivals, but will all the election promises be kept or is it more likely that we will see additional legislation concerning rent caps, longer tenancies and changes to tenant’s rights being introduced via other means?

The way I see it, the future under a Conservative Government will be no different from the experiences of the last 5 years.
The main targets will still be PRS landlord’s and letting agents and the victims will always be the tenants.

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Grab Your Copy Of The 2013 Emergency Cashflow Report

Grab Your Copy Of The 2013 Emergency Cashflow Report

Warning: Why buying property
could ruin you

More people than ever are discovering that property investing is an excellent way of making substantial returns on their savings.

Savings that would normally be eroded away in their bank accounts thanks to high inflation and low interest rates.

It’s no secret – ordinary people, with no specialist property investment education, are right now buying properties easily, with big discounts, renting them out, and making consistent monthly cashflow profits – without having to become ‘hands-on landlords’ or becoming overwhelmed in the process.

BUT with easy access to finance, a plentiful supply of heavily discounted properties, strong tenant demand and a massive rental market to play with, comes a warning

As with every investment boom and opportunity, it is your responsibility to make yourself aware of the facts, and not become sold on the hype and excitement of other people generating cash from property investment.

Get The Insider’s Secrets On Profitable Property Investing

If YOU are thinking of investing, or continuing to invest in property in 2013/2014, then it’s essential you read the latest Property Cashflow Report, written by 4-Time Bestselling Property Investment Authors Rob Moore & Mark Homer, the brains behind Progressive Property.

If you’re brand new to property and property investing, this report will give you the best step-by-step guide to generating a healthy second, or even replacement income…

Access the report here before Wednesday

Rob & Mark have bought over 350 properties since 2005, trained over 300 private VIP clients, and trained over 26,700 residential property investors.

In the last 8 years they’ve witnessed the expensive property investing mistakes, the lengthy tests, and they have documented action-steps which create reliable, cash-flowing buy to let property investments.

These two controversial, 30 year old property investors, who were recently featured by the BBC, are releasing their 6th annual Property Cashflow Report

Inside you’ll read the nuts-and-bolts details of how to buy and profit from residential property, explicit facts highlighting the mistakes and assumptions about property investing that you must avoid, mistakes that other investors have already fallen victim to…

PLUS: The full debrief of the biggest controversial warning ever to be shared outside of the property investment community.

Access the report here before Wednesday

Don’t expect any fluff or padded filler waffling about the joys of property investing, this report delivers the reality about what to do, HOW to do it, and what to avoid for the next 12 months, including:

  • The property investing buying process – every step explained in simple terms
  • How to ALWAYS have enough money to invest, age and credit no factor
  • Why buying at auction is one of the best kept secrets + how it works
  • How to make £2k per month without ever owning property
  • How to make letting, tenancy, and property management easy and stress-less
  • How to find big discount properties through estate agents – at zero cost!
    &…
  • The Top 20 Mistakes Investors Make When Dealing with Agents

Access the report here before Wednesday

PLUS: Case studies of career employees who have easily replaced their above-average incomes, on their own terms, by simply following the advice complied in this report.

Download your copy now, and avoid risking your finances RUINED by poor investment decisions or inexperienced guesswork.

Access the report here before Wednesday

2013 Emergency Cashflow Report

Mortgages for private property purchases and Buy To Let landlords and business credit are becoming more widely available, thanks in part to the Government’s financial initiative, the Funding for Lending Scheme.

Mortgages More Widely Available in 2013

Mortgages More Widely Available in 2013

An indicator that moves to ease lending restrictions and free up credit appear to be working.

The £80 Billion (GBP) Government scheme, launched in August 2012 was intended to boost the flow of credit to private households and businesses.

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Bank of England's Funding For Lending Scheme Beginning To Have Effect

Bank of England’s Funding For Lending Scheme Beginning To Have Effect

The £80 Billion (GBP) Funding for Lending Scheme (FLS), launched in August by the Bank of England (BoE) and HM Treasury, is starting to show signs of having a positive effect.

The multi Billion pound scheme designed to unclog the flow of credit to the UK’s residential homebuyers is having the desired impact as official figures show an upturn in mortgage approvals.

The Funding for Lending Scheme (FLS) makes money available to banks on the condition they pass it on to businesses and households in the form of cheaper loans and mortgages.

The Bank of England have stated that the number of loans approved for residential property purchases rose by 2,103 to 50,024 in September 2012 and the number of loans approved for re-mortgaging increased by 1,860 to 28,343.

Meanwhile, unsecured consumer credit has also increased by £1.2 Billion (GBP) in September 2012, the sharpest rise since February 2008, including an increase of £307 Million (GBP) in credit card borrowing while the remaining £900 Million (GBP) came from overdrafts and unsecured personal loans.

Borrowers have faced even tougher times trying to take out a mortgage in recent months as lenders tightened their lending criteria even further, causing a drop in the proportion of mortgages approved.

The average interest rate on new mortgages also fell slightly, from 3.84% to 3.77%, offering some hope that the recent rise in borrowing costs may also be starting to ease.

Governor of the Bank of England, Sir Mervyn King, said that “More than 20 banking groups, including the five largest lenders in the UK, have signed up to the Funding for Lending Scheme, while funding costs have fallen by around one percentage point”.

However, Sir Mervyn warned the initiative was temporary and lenders would have to accept further losses if normal banking services are ever to make a return.

The reductions in borrowing rates have primarily been aimed at households taking out mortgages with low Loan-To-Value (LTV) mortgages. So they may not help first-time buyers (FTBs) much.

As mentioned last week, borrowers are still faced with some degree of uncertainty when looking for mortgages or credit as despite all the positive noises made by the BoE and the Government, banks are still fairly reluctant to lend.
Read last week’s top story here.

The simplest solution may be to become your own bank!

Landlord Mortgages Are Hard To Get say RLA

Landlord Mortgages Are Hard To Get say RLA

According to a recent survey by the Residential Landlords Association (RLA), almost half of their landlord members have encountered difficulty when trying to obtain a buy-to-let or landlord mortgage.

141 RLA members were asked how easy they had found it to access a buy-to-let mortgage,

  • 21% said they were unable to obtain a buy-to-let mortgage
  • 24% said they found it very difficult
  • 22% had to shop around
  • 14% found it easy to get a mortgage
  • 17% said they found it fairly straightforward

The RLA said that the first major challenge for the new housing minister Mark Prisk will be to persuade banks to unlock the financial support needed by private landlords to grow the residential lettings sector at a time when more homes are needed.

RLA chairman Alan Ward said: “We welcome the Government’s renewed commitment and interest in the opportunities that the private rented sector can play in meeting the country’s housing needs. However, this will not happen without financing from the banks. It is time that the blame game for the difficulties in accessing finance between Government and the banks came to the end for the sake of those desperate for a roof over their heads.”

The release of the RLA data coincides with news that the UK mortgage market has endured its third worst August for almost two decades.

The news comes from e.surv, which are part of the LSL property group, who have made the gloomy forecast based on its own activity and reckons to be correct to within a near margin of official statistics which will be issued later in the month.

The firm is predicting that house purchase loans in August fell 8% from August 2011, down from 53,040 approvals to 48,913 – making last month the third worst August for almost 20 years.

Whilst last month’s figure was up from July’s 47,312, e-surv said this shouldn’t be taken as a sign of improving market conditions, saying that July was weak by historic standards with purchase approvals 5% lower than July 2011.

The firm said tightening credit conditions and the effects of the double-dip recession were moving the UK mortgage market back towards 2010 levels and the annual contraction in landlord mortgages is the result of a sharp fall in lending to borrowers with deposits of less than 15%.

The average LTV on a property purchase loan has now fallen below 60% for the last three months, reversing a seven-month period where it was at least 60%.
 
Richard Sexton, business development director of e.surv, said: “Much of the progress the mortgage market has made since summer 2011 has been unravelled by the double-dip recession. Lending volumes – particularly to first-time buyers – are slipping back towards the dismal levels we last saw in 2010 and early 2011. This is largely thanks to a fall in the number of high loan-to-value mortgages banks are willing to grant.  Credit conditions for banks have become painfully tight, and they’ve responded by toughening criteria on mortgages aimed at borrowers with small deposits. The distraction of the Olympics, the awful weather and holiday season could also all be reasonably cited as potential contributory factors.”
 
e.surv said August was the third consecutive month where lending has fallen on an annual basis, and the biggest year-on-year fall for 15 months since 1993, when the Bank of England’s records begin, only 2008 and 2010 have seen lower lending levels during August.

e.surv’s analysis found that more landlords have stepped in to fill the vacuum left by first-time buyers at the bottom of the market. Despite overall purchase approvals falling 8% year-on-year, approvals on property worth less than £125,000 fell by only 4% as landlord mortgages were used to purchase property that was out of reach of first-time buyers.
 
Sexton said: “With rents pushed up to record levels, landlords are piling in to cheap property. Tight mortgage lending conditions are a virtuous circle for landlords and a vicious one for first-time buyers. The fewer first-time buyers there are, the cheaper property becomes for landlords, and the more expensive rents get. We expect landlords to continue to represent a disproportionate share of the buying market in the medium term. Would-be buyers will hope the Government’s Funding for Lending scheme can help improve the flow of credit in the near future.”
 
There was some positive news in August. On a month-on-month basis, house purchase loans rose 3% from 47,312 in July.

But this shouldn’t be taken as sign that market conditions are set to improve. July was weak by historic standards – purchase approvals were 5% lower than July 2011 – and high LTV lending levels were the same as in August.

For access to a full list of mortgage brokers – Click Here

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has a new vision of the welfare state. He wants state benefits to be a safety net – and nothing more!,

The Prime Minister outlined future radical changes which on top of existing plans, could save the UK an extra £10 Billion (GBP) by 2016.

Government ministers expect this “next wave” of benefit cuts to include the axing of all housing benefit currently paid to around 380,000 people aged under 25.

Such a move would force many young adults to move back in with their parents rather than living independently.

Another controversial reform which could come in further down the line is setting benefit payments regionally – which would mean less money going to claimants who live in less-expensive parts of the country.

Some Tory MPs say the current system is unfair – with differing “incentives” on people to seek work depending on where they live. Liberal Democrats, however, would be likely to oppose any such changes.

The Prime Minister said his overall aim in reforming welfare was to stop people “languishing on the dole and dependency”.

Here are some of the welfare reforms Mr Cameron is considering

• Stopping most under-25s claiming housing benefit. Cameron said the government was spending almost £2bn a year on housing benefit for this group, and that 210,000 people aged 16 to 24 were social housing tenants. Many of them could live with their parents, he suggested.

• Scrapping the non-dependent deduction. Cameron said people could lose up to £74 a week in housing benefit if they have an adult child living with them. That “doesn’t seem right”, he said.

• Cutting benefits for the under-21s. Cameron said that in Holland the benefit system does not normally help the under-21s. When it does, benefits are set at a low level, and parents are expected to top them up.

• Ending subsidised social housing for the wealthy. Cameron said that between 12,000 and 34,000 families on more than £60,000 a year, and between 1,000 and 6,000 families on more than £100,000 a year, were living in council homes. “When you have people on £70,000 a year living for £90 or so a week in London’s most expensive postcodes you have to ask whether this is the best use of public resources,” he said.

• Uprating benefits in line with wage inflation instead of price inflation when price inflation is much higher. Cameron said in September benefits went up by 5.2% (inflation) even though workers were getting much lower pay rises. “Given that so many working people are struggling to make ends meet we have to ask whether this is the right approach,” Cameron said.

• Cutting benefits for the long-term unemployed. Cameron said that when the Americans decided to time-limit benefits in the 1990s, case-loads fell by more than 50%. “Instead of US-style time-limits – which remove entitlements altogether – we could perhaps revise the levels of benefits people receive if they are out of work for literally years on end,” he said.

• Cutting housing benefit further.
The government has already introduced a benefit cap to stop a relatively small number of families claiming exorbitant sums in housing benefit. But Cameron said this would still allow people to receive up to £20,000 a year in housing benefit. “Surely we should ask if it’s fair that the maximum amount that you can get on housing benefit is set at a level that only the top five per cent of earners would otherwise be able to afford,” he said.

• Stopping people from claiming child-related benefits if they have more than a certain number of children. Cameron did not say how many children, but he quoted the number of people on income support with three or more children (150,000) and four or more children (57,000), implying benefits could be capped at two children.

• Requiring people on out-of-work benefits to gain basic literacy and numeracy skills.

• Requiring people on out-of-work benefits to prepare a CV.

• Requiring able people on out-of-work benefits to do full-time community work after a certain period. In Australia this was standard after just six months, Cameron said.

• Requiring people on sickness benefits to improve their health. “Today if someone is signed off work with a bad back there’s no requirement to take steps to get well to keep on receiving that benefit – even if they could be getting free physiotherapy to get back to health and start working again,” Cameron said.

• Requiring more single parents to work – or at least to prepare for work. Cameron said the government was already forcing single parents to look for work when their youngest child reaches five, not seven as before. But, with free nursery care available from the age of three, there was a case for changing the rules again, he said. “Even if there’s no scope for actually working, there should at least be for preparing to work: getting down to the job centre; writing a CV; learning new skills.”

• Imposing tougher restrictions on people claiming benefits if they have never worked than if they have paid tax and national insurance for years before submitting a claim.

• Stopping teenagers from claiming benefits as soon as they leave school. Cameron said he wanted to ask “if it’s right that people continue to have the option of leaving school and going straight onto benefits, without ever having contributed to the system in any way.”

• Stopping paying winter fuel payments and other non-contributory benefits to people who live abroad.

• Stopping paying some benefits in cash and paying them instead in benefits in kind, like free school meals.

The Bank of England (BoE) have warned that in future getting a mortgage might be tougher than you think.

The BoE stated that tightened qualifications, set by a wide range of lenders, could see the credit rating of expectant borrowers fall beneath the banks’ accepted level for mortgages.

The Credit Conditions Survey, published quarterly, found that UK mortgage lending has shown signs of improvement in early 2012 but residential property buyers face a tough three months until summer.

 Most lenders expect the upward pressure on mortgage interest rates to be maintained and anticipate reducing the availability of mortgages in the next three months.

With little prospect of a material loosening in credit conditions on the cards, and housing market demand likely to remain weak, the downwards pressure on house prices is set to be maintained this year. 

Would be mortgage borrowers need to be prepared for the stricter criteria being demanded by mainstream lenders, meaning more difficulty in securing a mortgage.

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