Currently viewing the tag: "British Property Federation"
Local Authorities Urged To Build More Private Rental Sector Properties

Local Authorities Urged To Build More Private Rental Sector Properties

Local Authorities Urged To Promote Institutional Investment In Private Rented Sector Over Home Ownership

According to the report “Making Renting Viable“ commissioned by the British Property Foundation (BPF) and conducted by a leading London law firm; more UK local authorities should focus on building new residential properties for the private rented sector to encourage institutional investment instead of promoting local homeownership.

The British Property Foundation and Addleshaw Goddard who conducted the survey, reckon that UK local authorities should earmark land within their council boundaries for private rented sector (PRS) properties and set housing development targets to encourage pension funds and other institutions to invest more in the private rented sector.

Partner at Addleshaw Goddard, Marnix Elsenaar, said: “It’s vital councils recognise both the need for an institutional private rented sector that’s not the same as buy-to-let, while ministers should update planning guidance to make building for rent economically viable. Residential property was seen as more difficult than renting out a commercial office block, but the landscape has changed. Institutions want reliable, long-term returns and they should see a good degree of income growth in the private rented sector.

Continue reading »

Flood Insurance Plan Leaves Rental Properties Unprotected

Flood Insurance Plan Leaves Rental Properties Unprotected

New Flood Insurance Plan Leaves Private Rental Sector Properties Unprotected

The ill timed Government announcement over the changes to flood insurance does little to reassure property owners and landlords about flood insurance price rises as huge swathes of the country remain flooded after the winter storms.

The Government has finally reached a deal with the Association of British Insurers (ABI) to replace the ‘Statement of Principles’ agreement of the Water Bill, that was originally due to expire on 31st July 2013, under which insurers offered affordable flood insurance coverage to a majority of households in return for the Government maintaining spending on UK flood defences.

The British Property Federation (BPF) reported that an alliance of property industry leaders and the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) had huge concerns about the new plan, called Flood Re.

A number of organisations have already called for urgent amendments to the Water Bill, after it emerged that a significant number of properties that had been expected to be included within Flood Re, would instead be excluded.

Continue reading »

For the first time in UK history the Government have decided to regulate the UK lettings and property management industry

UK Lettings & Property Management Agents are to be regulated for the first time

UK Lettings & Property Management Agents are to be regulated for the first time

Lettings and property management agents in the UK are set to face government regulation, after decisions were made in the House of Commons to take action to clamp down on unscrupulous behaviour, according to reports.

The new rules will see amendments to the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill, will mean that all lettings and management agents will be required to sign up to a redress scheme allowing consumers to report unresolved disputes to an ombudsman, who will have the authority to ensure that agents repay any tenants and landlords they may have deceived.

The changes have come as welcome news to many property professionals, after calls from many corners for letting agents to be monitored and checked.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) extremely happy with the regulation changes, because they were at the forefront of the campaign for regulation.

Continue reading »

Property Investors Given False Hope

By Misleading Property Information

Property Investors Need To Do Thorough Due Diligence

Property Investors Need To Do Thorough Due Diligence

The importance of conducting thorough Due Diligence has again been highlighted, this time  by the British Property Federation (BPF) who have recently said that the lack of official data relating to the UK Buy To Let industry and the UK PRS rental markets as a whole may be giving landlords in some areas a false view of the potential profits they could make.

According to the BPF most of the survey and research data being broadcast on the internet is not representative of the UK property investment industry as a whole, and any potential landlords reading it could be led to believe figures that don’t apply to their local areas.

Continue reading »

Government’s Own Watchdog Warns Ministers Over Housing Mayhem

There will be a huge shortage of affordable Private Rented Sector (PRS) property for tenants claiming housing benefit if the Government Welfare reforms go ahead in the spring of 2013 as currently planned.

Welfare reform could lead to more Tenant Evictions

Welfare reform could lead to more Tenant Evictions

The warning has come from the Government’s own spending watchdog, the National Audit Office and has been backed by the British Property Federation (BPF), which says ministers should take action to stop UK Private Rented Sector (PRS) housing becoming unaffordable to tenants claiming benefits.

The National Audit Office says the danger comes from Local Housing Allowance (LHA), which is paid to benefit tenants in private rented accommodation, being calculated in line with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rather than local market rent inflation.

The National Audit Office says this could lead to a divergence between local area rents and benefits.

The British Property Federation reckons that Government ministers are aligning rents with the price of sausages.

By 2017 the National Audit Office warns that 48% of all UK local authorities could expect to have double the number of benefit applicants, than at present, looking for two-bedroom properties that they will not be able to afford.

Tenants currently claiming benefits may face financial hardship or even eviction when the proposed changes come into force.

From April 2013, the Government is set to change the way LHA increases are calculated, shifting its sums away from the 50th percentile of local market rents to either the Consumer Price Index or the 30th percentile of local market rents, whichever is the lower.

But knowledge among tenants about the proposed housing benefit changes is minimal, warns the report. Surveys of tenants living in private rented sector properties show that 87% know nothing or very little about the changes.

The report, ‘Managing the impact of Housing Benefit reform’, makes a series of recommendations, in particular that the Government should increase awareness of housing benefit and Universal Credit changes, particularly among those living in the private rented sector. The report also underlines that the National Audit Policy only analyses policy impact, but makes no comment on the policy itself.

The British Property Federation said the Government cannot ignore this report. Policy director Ian Fletcher said: “Since the cap was announced, we have expressed concern that the measure will rapidly and relentlessly erode what Local Housing Allowance will be for. This is because market rents have historically risen with earnings, rather than the basket of goods such as sausages and net curtains.”

The full report is here:http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/1213/housing_benefit_reform.aspx

The British Property Federation (BPF) handed a bit of good news to UK landlords who may have been struggling to make ends meet, after it was revealed that the UK coalition government may review imposing powers forcing landlords to share information on changes of tenancy with water companies, as well as making them liable for a defaulting tenant’s debts.

The failure of tenants to pay water bills for the property they are renting costs landlords and other home owning customers around £15 extra per year.

The new Flood and Water Management Act would mean that the government could make landlords and property owners pay water and sewerage bills if specified details of tenant occupiers are not forwarded to the relevant utility company departments.

Ian Fletcher, director of policy at the British Property Federation, explained: “Government policy in other areas is pushing for personal responsibility and the same should apply here that landlords should not be held liable for their tenants’ debts, which is simply unfair. We therefore welcome this review and agree that water companies could do more to limit bad debts. Landlords already provide a lot of information voluntarily, though this could be much easier and transparent with the right systems in place”.

Legal 4 Landlords advise all UK landlords to inform all utility companies (Gas, Electricity and Water) at the start and end of every tenancy as normal practice for all tenancies.

There Will Never Be A Better Time To Invest In Property

MyPropertyPowerTeam.co.uk helps property investors and landlords build their own property power team to enable them to profit from property - Visit our main site now!