Currently viewing the tag: "Association of Residential Letting Agents"
Landlords Outraged At Right To Rent Prison Threat

Landlords Outraged At Right To Rent Prison Threat

Landlords Outraged At
Right To Rent Prison Threat 

Private rental sector landlords and letting agents have expressed outrage over proposed amendments to the forthcoming Immigration Bill (2015) expected to be introduced in September, when MPs return from their summer break.

Section 20 – 37 of the Immigration Act 2014 contained the provision to make it compulsory for landlords to check the immigration status of all new adult tenants. Now officials want to enforce the measures, in order to strengthen their grip on the private rental sector (PRS).

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Letting Agents Confirm Rents Are Rising Again

Letting Agents Confirm Rents Are Rising Again

Letting Agents Confirm PRS Rents Are Rising Again

The latest report from the Association of Residential Letting Agents has discovered that 36% of ARLA registered letting agents reported private rented sector rent increases in June, taking PRS rental prices to their highest point since records began.

80% of ARLA letting agents surveyed expected private rental sector rents to continue to grow significantly over the next five years.

East Midlands letting agents reported 48% of tenants were charged increased rents, while letting agents in Wales only recorded 17% of tenants facing increased rental charges.

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PRS Tenants Could Be Hit With Rent Increases Despite Falling Inflation

PRS Tenants Could Be Hit With Rent Increases Despite Falling Inflation

PRS Tenants Could Be Hit With Rent Increases
Despite Falling Inflation

The increase in demand for rental properties in the UK’s private rental sector (PRS) from would-be tenants could drive local rental prices through the roof in some parts of the country according to a new report published by the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA).

According to data published in the latest ARLA monthly Private Rented Sector report 31% of letting agent members recorded an increase in the cost of monthly rent for rental properties in UK regions between January and February this year.

41% of letting agents in the South East of England reported landlords increasing rental prices for their properties. However, in Wales only 13% of letting agents reported landlords increasing rental asking prices.

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Tenancies Reform Bill Fails On Technicality

Tenancies Reform Bill Fails On Technicality

Tenancies Reform Bill Fails On Technicality

UK private rental sector (PRS) and social landlords were able to breathe a sigh of relief on Friday 28th November 2014, when the controversial Revenge Eviction Bill, or to use its correct title, the Tenancies Reform Bill, presented by Lib Dem MP Sarah Teather, failed to progress past its first reading in the House of Commons.

Rather than failing on a vote, the bill failed on a technicality after MP’s Philip Davies and Christopher Chope chose to talk it out, known as filibustering, because there were not enough MP’s present in the House of Commons to vote for the Bill. The debate started at approximately 9.30am and parliamentary procedure dictates that only Bills which remain unopposed after 2.30pm may make further progress.

MP’s who supported the Bill tried bringing forward a closure motion, to end the debate and call for an early vote, however for a successful majority, at least 100 MP’s must support it, but the motion was only supported by 60 MP’s and the debate on the Bill subsequently ended.

In order for the Tenancies Reform Bill to become law by the next election it must pass a second reading stage in the House of Commons, but it is not certain whether the Government will commit more parliamentary time to debate the Tenancies Reform Bill to try to force it through.

UK PRS and social tenants do need to be protected from the small minority of rogue landlords, and so do good, reliable, law abiding landlords.

It is far from fair that the majority of upstanding landlords should be expected to alter legal business practices because of criticism drawn by a few rogue operators within the UK’s private rented sector.

The Tenancies (Reform) Bill proposed restrictions on the serving of section 21 notices even where only a “hazard awareness notice” has been issued by a council. Landlords wouldl also be prevented from serving a section 21 notice where an improvement notice has been served on a rental property relating to category 1 or category 2 Hazards under the HHSRS rating system, or where the rental property requires emergency remedial action.

Tenants would also be able to challenge section 21 notices where they had complained to the landlord or council before the notice was issued, but the council was still deciding whether to even inspect the property in question.

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Tenants Fighting Each Other Over Rental Properties As Supply Drops And Demand Increases

Tenants Fighting Each Other Over Rental Properties As Supply Drops And Demand Increases

Tenants Fighting Each Other Over Rental Properties
As Supply Drops And Demand Increases

Tenants looking to rent in the UK’s private rented sector face competition from other would be tenants as demand increases and supply contracts, according the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA).

ARLA’s latest report has discovered that 68% of landlords surveyed reported more interested tenants than available rental properties.

This is the largest successive increase in tenant demand in the last 12 months, with tenant demand figures up from 46% in Q3 2013, 54% in Q1 2014, 59% in Q2 2014; meaning an increase of 9% between the second and third quarters of the year to date.

The tenant demand data is reinforced by the fact that supply of suitable rental properties in the private rental sector has decreased in the last quarter, with ARLA letting agent members recording a 6% drop in the average number of managed Buy To Let properties on their books, down from 143 to 135 per member agency.

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MPPT Spotlight are focusing on Tenants this week with a series of articles on getting the best out of tenant

MPPT Spotlight are focusing on Tenants this week with a series of articles on getting the best out of tenants

Tenants Admit Having Problems With Landlords And Letting Agents

55% of tenants in the UK’s private rented sector (PRS) have experienced problems with their landlord or their appointed letting agents according to the latest research from the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA).

The most common issue which affected 31% of PRS tenants was the length of time taken to fix problems in rental properties including issues with boilers, heating and electrical outlets.

Once a problem was raised, tenants have waited an average of 36 days for the problem to be fully resolved. However over 14% of PRS tenants never had their rental property problems fixed at all, according to the research.

18% of tenants surveyed also reported frustrating delays with landlords not replacing worn out fixtures and fittings on demand, including requests to replace old or damaged kitchen cupboards or tired and worn carpets.

14% of the tenants surveyed, felt that their complaints about repair issues were either ignored or brushed off by landlords or their appointed letting agents.

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HMRC Want Landlords To Get Tax Affairs In Order

HMRC Want Landlords To Get Tax Affairs In Order

HMRC Want Landlords To Get Tax Affairs In Order

UK property investors and private rental sector landlords are being offered tax training online by Her Majesties Revenue and Customs (HMRC), in order to make it easier for them to understand when and how to pay tax on property assets.

The computer-based training tutorials are aimed at property investors and private rental sector landlords who are renting out property and have not registered to pay tax, or have under-declared their rental incomes or have under-paid tax.

The tax training is part of HMRC’s Let Property campaign, and it is understood that HMRC are also in discussion with various landlord associations in order to make the training available to their members.

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3 Compulsory Redress Schemes To Investigate Lettings Complaints

3 Compulsory Redress Schemes To Investigate Lettings Complaints

3 Compulsory Redress Schemes
To Investigate Lettings Complaints

The Government have approved three compulsory redress schemes to offer landlords and tenants in the UK private rented sector independent investigation into complaints in the property management and lettings industry, bringing them in line with redress schemes already in operation for residential property sales.

The 3 lettings industry redress schemes are:

  • The Property Ombudsman
  • Ombudsman Services Property
    • The Property Redress Scheme 

The new schemes will consider all complaints made by tenants and landlords including non-disclosed fees and poor service delivery, and as with residential property sales where a complaint is upheld, tenants, landlords and leaseholders could receive compensation.

Two of the three redress schemes have been around for a while and The Property Ombudsman (TPO) is probably the most recognised of the two pre-existing schemes but little is known about the new Property Redress Scheme.

Most letting agents in the UK are already registered with at least one redress scheme, however 40% of the entire lettings industry, estimated to be around 3,000 agents, are to be encouraged to join up before membership is made mandatory later this year.

Housing Minister Kris Hopkins said that he hoped the new rules would strike the right balance between protecting tenants in the UK private rented sector and not harming the UK lettings industry with excessive red tape. The new redress schemes were just one part of the government’s efforts to secure a better deal for tenants in the PRS, stating: “All tenants and leaseholders have a right to fair and transparent treatment from their letting agent. Most tenants are happy with the service they receive, but a small minority of agents are ripping people off, and giving the whole industry a bad name. That’s why we will require all agents to belong to one of the official redress schemes. They will ensure tenants and landlords have a straightforward route to take action if they get a poor deal, while avoiding excessive red tape that would push up rents and reduce choice for tenants.”

The Property Ombudsman, Christopher Hamer said: “TPO experienced a 34.2% increase in consumer enquiries relating to unregistered letting agents during 2013, which really underlines the importance of mandatory redress. Whilst my role as Ombudsman means that I am not a regulator and I can only review complaints after a dispute has occurred, making redress a legal requirement for lettings is a positive move. Clearly it would be better if complaints did not arise in the first place and robust legislation to enforce controls was in place.”

There are thousands of decent letting agents in the UK but there are also a fair proportion of rogue agents who operate under the radar, that lack the much needed transparency on fees and who are fleecing both tenants and landlords alike.

Landlords should ensure their appointed property managing or letting agent is registered with the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA) or the UK Association of Letting Agents (UKALA).

Most UK tenants are unaware that they could be leaving themselves open to exploitation if the agent is not a member of at least one of the regulatory associations.

Will Landlords Be Safe Under New Rental Rules?

Will Landlords Be Safe Under New Rental Rules?

Tenants Charter could put tenants in a

stronger position over PRS landlords

Regulations which hand private rented sector tenants more power and rights to request longer leases have been greeted with cautious optimism, although the new code of practice, intended for launch by the Government, would bring in much-needed protection for many tenants from rogue and inexperienced landlords.

The proposed Tenants’ Charter, could mean honest and hard working landlords are at a disadvantage and could be put off from renting out properties.

The results of the introduction, could lead to another shortage of available rental stock for the UK property market leading to rent increases and landlords becoming trapped by more stringent legal binding agreements.

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Compulsory Redress Schemes For Lettings And Property Managing Agents New Government Measures Intend

To Regulate Private Rented Sector

The Government has announced that there are to be new regulations introduced in 2014 to provide private rented sector landlords, tenants and leaseholders with additional protection when working with lettings agents or property managing agents.

The Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) want the introduction of compulsory redress schemes for lettings and property managing agents will ensure that they can be fully investigated where information is not made clear on additional charges, administration fees or any other property or tenant related issue. The proposed measures are intended to provide a cheaper, easier way for landlords, tenants and leaseholders to pursue compensation from lettings and property managing agents if they have a complaint.

The conditions that have to be met by lettings and property managing agents to be a part of a redress scheme have now been published by the Government.

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