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Online property portal, Rightmove states that it has recorded a drop in the average asking price for residential property this month, the first significant fall since January 2012.

Average UK residential property prices have fallen by 1.7%, a drop of around £4,138 (GBP),

The demand for residential property has been low due to a number of factors:

  • Euro 2012
  • The weather, deterring potential buyers from viewing properties,
  • The Olympics, for distracting people’s focus away from moving.

Righmove said that there were twice as many people trying to sell a property than those trying to buy one, with each branch of the agency having an average of 75 residential properties that they were unable to sell.

The company warned property vendors that further asking price cuts could be necessary to secure a sale.

Director of Rightmove Miles Shipside, said: “The fact that we have not seen major price falls in the UK and that many areas are not awash with ‘For Sale’ boards may lead some sellers to be over-optimistic with their pricing. New seller numbers may be down some 30% on the period prior to credit-crunch, but the numbers achieving a successful sale are down by half and average unsold stock levels are creeping up.”

The West Midlands was the only region in England and Wales where prices increased in July compared with the previous month – with asking prices up 2% to £191,121.

In contrast, residential property prices dropped most in London, compared with the previous month, with a fall of 3.6% to £460,304.

UK landlords with rent guarantee insurance stay happy despite property doom and gloom

Landlords with Rent Guarantee insurance remain happiest

New data released by Nationwide and Hometrack show that overall UK residential property values have fallen when compared to this time last year and the fall has been attributed to the changes in stamp duty.

The average residential property value in March 2012 was £163,327. That is 0.9% lower than property prices were in March 2011, the largest fall in UK house prices since June last year.

Nationwide’s figures showed a fall in nearly every region of the UK, compared with the previous quarter and data from Hometrack shows a clear North – South divide.

However residential property prices increased by 0.6% in the north of England, property values also increased in Scotland, and Greater London.

UK mortgage applications were also affected by Stamp duty changes, approvals dropped to 48,986 in February 2012, some 9,000 lower than the 25-month high recorded in January 2012, the lowest mortgage approval figures for three years, according to the Bank of England.

UK residential property prices may have fallen for the first time in six months, but UK landlords with Rent Guarantee insurance are still smiling.

Buy To Let landlords remain unfazed by the dip in UK residential property prices as they continue to maximise their rental returns, as demand for rental property continues to increase. In fact BTL landlords have been experiencing higher rental yields during the past 6 months than at any other time since the economic crash in 2007.

UK landlords are utilising specialist products and services such as Rent Guarantee insurance to keep the cash coming in, ensuring that the rent is paid, irrespective of any changes to their tenants circumstances.

Residential property values increasingly disparate between North and South in UK

Residential Property Disparity Between The North and South

UK property values posted a monthly price rise for the first time in 20 months in March on the back of increased demand, activity and a scarcity of residential properties for sale.

However, UK Property Prices overall were up in the South and down in the North

According to fresh data released by Hometrack, UK residential property prices are still rising in the South, but property values have seen widespread falls throughout the East Midlands, Wales and the North.

During March 2012, residential property values did dip a little in a few parts of London, the South-West and East Anglia. However, in Yorkshire and Humber, about half the region saw property prices fall. Property values were also down in the East Midlands, North West and Wales,

With such widespread variations, the Hometrack survey shows that nationally residential property prices as a whole are barely moving, up just 0.2% from February 2012.

There was only a 4.4% increase in new buyers registering with agents, compared to 18% in February.

The length of time taken to sell a residential property also varies widely across the country, from 11.6 weeks in the Midlands and North to under six weeks in London.

Hometrack’s Director of Research, Richard Donnell, said: “The housing market is not firing on all cylinders nationally. The divergence in the relative strength in northern and southern England is set to remain. We expect prices to track sideways in the short term, with the outlook for the second half of the year hinging on households’ expectations for the economy and their incomes.”

The Hometrack report does not give residential property prices, but said that in London property prices rose 0.5% in March, the highest monthly increase since April 2010.

However, the increase in London property prices were recorded pre-Budget, when Stamp Duty on properties valued at £2 Million (GBP) plus increased from 5% to 7%, for private purchasers, and 15%for properties bought by partnerships, collective investment funds and companies.

The survey results reveal a clear divide in the strength of the UK property market between southern England and the rest of the country.

Hometrack reckon that all the evidence points to a continued firming up in UK property prices over the next few months as demand for residential property increases and the supply of available properties remains subdued.

New property instructions coming to market have seen vendors raise the average asking price by 4.1%

The average property asking price for new instructions put on the market within the last 4 weeks is now £233,252.

The almost £11,000 increase is up from January’s average asking price of £224,060, despite a warning that much of the residential property stock already on the market in some parts of the UK, is “over-priced and unsaleable”.

Rightmove have described the highest monthly increase since April 2002, the biggest rise in UK property asking prices for nearly ten years as “a surprisingly strong uplift given the challenging economic environment”.

But it said that the rise is partly fuelled by cash-rich sectors of the market, where buyer demand is exceeding suitable property supply.

Director Miles Shipside warned property vendors: “There is pricing power if you are selling the right type of property in the right place, where enough potential buyers have access to funding. But if your local market does not have those characteristics and your price-pump is based on little more than seasonal optimism and an estate agent’s hot air, then be prepared for buyer response to be a let-down.”

He added: “In some micro-markets, sellers have the upper hand, but on the whole, a buyer with cash or a mortgage offer is the one in the driving seat.”

After depressed activity in the UK property market over the last four years, some households have decided they had to get on and move. This means that here could be a growing acceptance by the British public that the state of today’s housing market is the new norm.

Mr Shipside said: “Search activity on Rightmove is up by 19% on January 2011 and it could be a sign that some of those who can afford to move have decided to get on with their lives, driven either by desperation or by coming to terms with the constant barrage of negative economic news being the new norm. You can get tired of gloomy news or get used to it, and indeed for some cash-rich buyers, life has moved on to such an extent that it’s like the Lehman Brothers collapse never happened. Stock levels are still on the high side in some less active parts of the country, but much of that stock is perhaps over-priced and unsaleable. However, in some micro-markets, the shortage of existing and new instructions has helped contribute to the largest monthly jump in new selling asking prices for nearly a decade. While the mass-market stays at home, those that have access to funding continue to be active and have spending power, resulting in this month’s big price hike.”

Average weekly listings on Rightmove are currently 30% below 2007 (pre-credit crunch levels), with a weekly run rate of 24,406 new listings.

Rightmove’s current asking price of £233,252 appears to be £70,000 ahead of current actual property selling prices, when compared with the selling prices currently being reported by Halifax and Nationwide of £160,907 and £162,228 respectively.

There really could not be a better time to invest in UK property, and London is a favourite spot for Buy To Let Landlords.

Property investors looking for Buy-To-Let investment opportunities may have the chance to bag a property bargain after average residential property asking price fell by more than £7,000 (GBP) last month. That’s the biggest fall in monetary terms for almost 4 years.

The average asking price for a residential property in England and Wales in November is now £232,144, down 3.1% compared with October, according to the latest survey by property website Rightmove.

The number of new property instructions on the market also fell back to levels last seen during the 2008 collapse of American investment bank Lehman Brothers, which sent the global economy into recession.

Even London could not buck the trend in dipping valuations as all regions in England and Wales were hit by monthly property price falls for the first time in over 3 years.

Although London is still the prime location for buy-to-let investors, as rental rates rose faster in the UK’s capital city than in any other UK region over the past 12 months.

Amid a flagging market, London’s annual increase in rental rates remains significantly higher than other parts of England and Wales.

Rental rates in London increased by 5.7% in October, compared to a 4.6% rise in the West Midlands, and a 4.4% rise in the South East.

Rental yields also rose in the capital, increasing to 5% last month from 4.9% in October 2010

However, the rate at which rental rates are rising has slowed, and the annual increase to 5.7% in October does represent a fall from 5.8% in the previous month. But rents have now risen for 9 months in a row and already stand at a new record high, while the average yield remained steady at 5.3%.

When these figures are combined, buy-to-let landlords with rental property in the UK’s capital city are very happy investors.

For the rest of the UK, the average property asking price in November 2011 fell by £7,528 compared with October 2011, the biggest monthly drop in financial terms since December 2007, although this is still 1.2% higher than November 2010

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