Currently viewing the tag: "allowance"
Landlords Could Be Taxed Out Of The Market

Landlords Could Be Taxed Out Of The Market

Conservatives Set About Raising Increased
Tax Revenue From Landlords

Before the general election the Conservatives were the only political party to not openly target landlords and property investors with manifesto rhetoric, making them the property professional’s choice for power.

Even before the budget statement was delivered by Mr Osborne, there was plenty of press coverage about the generous tax treatment enjoyed by private rental sector (PRS) landlords and buy to let property investors.

So it was of little surprise that the Chancellor chose to turn to the private rental sector in order to raise some additional revenue for the government.

Conservatives Vowed To Leave PRS Landlords AloneSpotlight predicted that this would happen after the Conservatives were elected, and this year’s summer budget could be just the tip of the iceberg.

George Osborne before the  summer 2015 budget announcement George Osborne’s post election Budget announcement, made earlier in July, contained two  important changes to buy-to-let taxation that will impact on portfolio landlords and higher rate  tax payers.

Continue reading »

Budget Targets Landlords

Budget Targets Landlords

Was The Budget Really That Much Of A Surprise?

The first Conservative budget for 20 years was expected to be good for Britain; however, the reality was not what many landlords wanted to hear.

The decision to target private rental sector landlords and property investors wasn’t too much of a surprise, as the Government can plainly see where the profits are being made and they, like all the rest of the political parties, want a slice.

On the run up to the general election in May 2015 every other political party openly stated that they intended to target landlords, whilst the conservatives remained quiet, prompting a few political commentators to predict that policies would be introduced surreptitiously that would effectively put money into Government coffers.

That’s exactly what we got last week!

The key points that affect landlords from George Osborne’s budget statement include:

Benefit Cap Lowered To £20,000 (GBP)

The total amount of benefits a family can receive over the course of a year has been reduced from £26,000 (GBP) to £20,000 (GBP) – (£23,000 in London).

This is a particular concern for landlords as any loss of income from the reduced benefit cap will hit tenants’ housing benefit first.

Many private rental sector landlords are now worried about increased rent arrears and the probability that many areas of the UK will become unaffordable for large families to live in.

The Government have said that they will allocate £800 Million (GBP) of discretionary housing payments for councils to help affected tenants.

Housing Benefit Abolished For Under-21s

From April 2017 the automatic entitlement to housing benefit for 18- to 21-year-olds will be scrapped for new claimants.

Exceptions will be made for vulnerable young people, including those unable to return to their family home and claimants who were in work for six months prior to making a claim.

Working-Age Benefits Frozen For Four Years

The freeze means Local Housing Allowance (LHA) will fall further behind inflation as the chancellor seeks to stop the housing benefit bill soaring with increasing rents.

Buy To Let Landlord Mortgage Relief Cut

In a £2bn tax bombshell, from April 2017 landlords will no longer be able to claim tax reliefs worth 40% or 45% of the interest payments on their buy-to-let mortgages. Instead, the maximum tax relief will be set at 20%, although the change will be introduced over a four-year period.

Effectively it looks as though 40%/45% taxpayers will only get around half of their mortgage interest (and arrangement fees) offset against their rental income.

20% taxpayers shouldn’t see much change as all mortgage relief will be limited to the basic rate of income tax.

The effect of this will be staged meaning that

  • 25% of this extra tax will be payable on profits made in the April 2017 – April 2018 tax year,
  • 50% in April 2018 – April 2019,
  • 75% in April 2019 – April 2020
  • 100% in April 2020 – April 2021 meaning that the full effect of this change won’t be felt until the January 2022 personal tax bill is due.

Despite the staged introduction many PRS landlords have warned that this could see costs passed on to tenants in the form of higher rents.

Wear And Tear Allowance Tightened

Landlords will have to prove they have improved or maintained their rental property before they can deduct the costs from their taxed profits.

Currently, landlords can deduct 10% of the rent from their profits to account for wear and tear regardless of whether they have improved the property or not.

From April 2016 this is set to be replaced by a new system that only allows landlords to get tax relief when they replace furnishings.

Changes To Non-Domicile Rules

This change in entitlement could affect property investment and buy to let, particularly in London as people born in the UK to parents domiciled here will not be able to inherit non-dom status and people will not be able to have permanent non-dom status.

Anyone resident in the UK for 15 of the last 20 years will have to pay full UK tax.

Rent A Room Tax Free Income Threshold Raised

After 18 years, the Rent A Room tax free income threshold is being raised to £7,000 (GBP) per year. There are an estimated 19 million empty bedrooms in owner-occupied properties in England alone. Freeing up just 5% of those rooms would accommodate 1 million people. This move will also fuel the growth in short, informal lets such as the type offered by Airbnb and the like.

The tax reliefs that have been cut by Mr Osborne were hugely important for landlords in being able to offset other astronomic property costs such as lettings agent fees, landlord insurance, maintenance and repairs costs, as well as council tax.

It is still early days and we need to see how HMRC will implement some of these changes, because they may also try to find additional ways to stop property investors and landlords from profiting from property, however, there are ways to get around some of the changes introduced, including:

Tax Relief

Limited (Ltd) companies appear to be excluded from the mortgage relief cuts meaning that property investors and landlords could potentially look to purchase their future investment properties through Ltd companies.

Buy To Let mortgage lenders could become more open to this method of purchasing properties similar to the way that commercial lenders already facilitate.

Landlords who already own properties personally or in a Limited Liability Partnership (LLP) may want to transfer them to a Limited (Ltd) company; however, they will be subject to capital gains tax and stamp duty.

An alternative method to transfer property ownership whilst retaining the current mortgage would be by using a deed of trust, which would transfer the beneficial ownership to a Ltd company. A good solicitor can draw one of these up for you.

Property investors and landlords could also switch their focus slightly and purchase more properties that need refurbishments.

As long as the property is in a habitable condition when purchased but still needs redecoration and comes into the lettings market before the refurb is done, most repairs such as kitchens, bathrooms, paint etc can be offset against all property income from a whole rental portfolio.

Bird_OldLadyWe will always try to keep our sector alive and rents affordable as we are providing services to people who need them, we don’t set out to rip people off, we’re not politicians, we are the ones who take the financial risks, we’re the people who provide housing and it’s our name on the deeds not yours.

You see Mr Osborne, whilst you may think that you are being clever and are tapping in to wealth generated by other people’s hard work and risk taking, well, we as landlords won’t be beaten!

The latest data published by the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA) has revealed another upward trend in landlord investment and property portfolio building, despite the poor availability of adequate Buy-To-Let mortgages.

The number of UK PRS rental properties owned by landlords increased from seven at the beginning of 2012 to 8 in the final quarter of 2012, with on average, at least 1 of these properties being a HMO.

Continue reading »

Hi All
My property management agents were in the process of interviewing a pair of prospective tenants for one of my properties. The applicants were a homeless married couple who had been forced to relocate to the area due to losing their jobs and wanted to move to an area with better employment opportunities.

The application was going great until it came to checking the couple’s housing benefit entitlement….

According to the local authority (I wont name and shame them here for legal reasons) the married couple were only entitled to the shared room rate because they were married and under 35. The management company attempted to argue over such blatant discrimination by the local authority but the facts seemed to fall on deaf ears.

Single claimants under 35 would be entitled to receive the shared room rate in full as individuals, but because the applicants were married they only counted as a single applicant!

It has taken 4 months of hard work, stress and a great deal of legal wrangling to sort out, including requests for Discretionary Payments, consultations with LHA professionals and arguements with various Government departments.

Following tips and advice gleaned from “The Essential Landlords LHA Handbook” I have now been able to get the full 2 bed LHA rate paid directly to me and the local authority have been forced to make a grovelling apology to the tenants!

It just goes to show that when armed with the right information and legal standpoints there are always options open to landlords, and it pays to invest in the knowledge of experts!

I would like to publicly thank the LHA Expert for his brilliant LHA book and tons of helpful advice!

Tagged with:
 
Help the RLA

Join The Residential Landlords Association

Details of the Government’s new procedures for the payment of universal credit have been released – and they confirm that the landlord’s right to insist on direct rent payments if a tenant is in arrears will be scrapped.

Instead, payments will be made directly to tenants and it will be up to them to pay their rents or not. The proposals will mean the end of direct payment to landlords for rent as we have known it, and the new procedures will apply across the board to local authority tenants, housing association tenants and tenants in the private rented sector.

The RLA has serious concerns about the proposals:

1. No back stop provision under which a landlord can demand payment direct.
2. Lack of clarity/much greater individual discretion in operating these rules because “guidance” replaces regulations.
3. No means of redress for landlords if things go wrong/no rights of appeal.
4. No proposal that the guidance should reflect the landlords interests to make sure that rent is paid and that a roof is kept over the head of the claimant.
5. The whole concept of trying to improve tenant’s responsibility at the cost of much greater risk to landlords with strong likelihood of significantly higher arrears.
6. Much less likelihood of landlords being willing to take on benefit claimants. This could even translate into less likelihood of a willingness to take on claimants who are in work especially part time work because the same rules will apply to them.
7. No provision for first payment of benefit direct to the landlord.
8. We have argued with DWP that there should be a right for landlords to be paid direct payments once there are six weeks arrears and also that the whole system of vulnerability should be assessed according to the tenant’s interest of keeping a roof over their head and the landlord’s interest to receive the money, as well as the public interest of making sure that the benefit is used for its intended purpose.

Richard Jones, the RLA’s policy director, said, “We strongly believe that the Government’s whole approach is flawed and although the objective of helping tenants manage their financial affairs is in isolation a laudable one, the Government has wholly failed to appreciate the consequences of this. There will be a much higher level of arrears, an unwillingness of landlords to house benefit claimants (at a time when there is huge pressure on social housing), increased unwillingness by banks to lend for this kind of property (or increased interest rate to reflect the risk), much higher levels of evictions and much greater homelessness.”

The RLA has produced a briefing note for landlords, and this can be downloaded by clicking here.

What can I do?

Further details will follow about how you can assist the RLA in opposing these proposals.#

Join the Residential Landlords Association

Tagged with:
 

In an interview with the Mail on Sunday, Prime Minister David Cameron suggested cutting housing benefit for people under the age of 25 in an attempt to claw back Millions of pounds worth of Government money

Housing benefit is paid to adults on a low income, to help them pay their rent, either to the local council, a private landlord or to a hostel.

It is currently paid to around 380,000 under-25s and scrapping their entitlement would save the government around £2 Billion (GBP) a year.

The Prime Minister suggested that the current housing benefit system is sending out “strange signals” that people are “better off not working, or working less”. It encourages people not to work and have children, but we should help people to work and have children”.

The proposed reforms to the welfare system could be presented as an effort to reduce a feeling of antipathy towards people on benefits that may exist among the general public.

Mr Cameron said that current benefits system has “led to huge resentment amongst those who pay into the system, because they feel that what they are having to work hard for, others are getting without having to put in the effort.”

He also commented that cutting housing benefit for younger people would “stop the state dragging young people into dependency”.

Downing Street said that Mr Cameron wanted to encourage a debate about welfare.

The Prime Minister is also considering proposals to set benefits at a regional level, rather than a national level, in order to reflect wide regional variations in pay.

Political analysts have suggested that Mr Cameron’s comments are part of an effort to reconnect with Conservative backbenchers who believe the party’s values are being watered down under the coalition.

Housing charity Shelter has warned that cutting housing benefit for young people could lead to an increase in homelessness.

The charity’s chief executive Campbell Robb said: “To take away housing benefit from hundreds of thousands of young people – particularly in the current economic environment where young people in particular are finding it very difficult to find jobs – would have a devastating impact on many people’s lives. I think we would see many more people ending up homeless as a result of this kind of very significant change.”

Tagged with:
 
More Struggling UK Home Owners Are Becoming Live In Landlords

Increase In Live-In Landlord Numbers

More home owners are becoming live-in landlords by putting their spare rooms to use and bringing in additional rental income.
The number of UK home-owners that are choosing to rent out a spare room in their own homes has increased by 19% during the last six months according to 2 of the UK’s leading house sharing websites.

The house sharing website Easyroommate claim that in February this year, the number of live-in landlords, (home-owners trying to let out spare rooms), has increased to 34% of the total number of users currently searching for housemates.

The website also reports a 5% increase of live-in landlords between January and February this year

A similar picture is also painted by Spareroom.com who reported a peak in lodger registration numbers in early January, resulting in almost 6,000 UK residential property owners renting out spare rooms by the end of the month.

Average flat share rental asking prices across the UK have also remained consistently at £368 for the last three months, following a marked increase in rents towards the end of 2011

January was a record month for new lodger numbers, up 15% on the previous record month last August. New lodger numbers in January were also up 83% on December 2011 and 22% higher than January 2010.

EasyRoomMate Director Jonathan Moore said: “With the vast number of home owners looking to boost their incomes during the recession, a growing number are waking up to the income trapped in their spare rooms. This is also compounded by the vast majority of people reluctant to downsize due to the loss of equity in their homes.”

With many home owners with grown up families and large properties struggling to keep on top of their mortgage payments, utility bills and accumulating personal debts, renting out a spare room on a short or long term basis has proved an easy way to earn extra income and keep mortgage payments covered.

However live in landlords are urged not to cut corners when accepting new tenants living in their homes. Legal 4 Landlords advise all landlords to at least thoroughly tenant reference all prospective applicants, so that they know more about the person moving into their homes.

SpareRoom puts the average UK room rent at £398 per month, with London bucking the trend with rents ranging between £542 and £677 (GBP) per month.

Spareroom Director Matt Hutchinson, said: “It’s not surprising that the lodger population is expanding so rapidly as home owners look for ways to boost their incomes. With the Government’s Rent a Room scheme allowing people to earn the first £4,250 (GBP) per year without declaring any tax on the income, it is still one of the easiest ways for struggling home owners to earn some extra cash. For some people, the monthly income from a lodger will be the difference between losing their home and keeping it. In parts of the country such as London, where demand for rented accommodation is soaring, live-in landlords are helping to ease the pressure on the rental market by providing an additional supply of rooms to meet increasing tenant demand.”

Government Welfare Reforms Stumble

Government Welfare Reforms Stumble

The UK Coalition Government plans to cap benefits will still be fully implemented despite the parliamentary defeat in the House of Lords on Monday this week.
A defeat that saw 26 Lib-Dem peers rebel against the Government’s wishes.

Although, the Government have admitted that whilst disappointed by the result, they still intend to push through the plans for welfare reform in full.

The plans have caused deep unease in the Lords and prompted a number of Church of England bishops to launch a bid for the reforms to be curbed, backed by a majority of 15.

Bishop of Ripon and Leeds, the Right Reverend John Packer introduced the amendment and following its success, said: “It cannot be right for the cap to be the same for a childless couple as for a couple with children. Child benefit is the most appropriate way to right this unfairness.”

Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith led the Government’s call for all benefit payments limited to a maximum £26,000 a year per household, claiming that it will save approximately £600 Million (GBP) towards the UK’s multi Billion pound economic deficit.

Lord Paddy Ashdown joined 25 other Lib Dem peers voting for child benefit to be excluded from the cap calculations. The former party leader, previously a loyal supporter of the Government, said that as president of the United Nations children’s agency UNICEF, he was not prepared to back the Government’s plans in their current form, denouncing them as “completely unacceptable”.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has stated that he fully supports the Governments changes to the welfare benefit system, despite the rebellious divisions from within the Lib-Dem ranks.

A Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) spokesman said: “There has to be a limit on the amount of money benefit claimants can receive. We think that limit is set at a fair rate of £26k – the equivalent to someone earning £35,000 before tax, a salary that many working families would be happy to receive.”

Around 67,000 families will lose £83 a week under the cap, which is due to be brought in from 2013 in England, Scotland and Wales.

It is expected that the welfare reforms will result in many families currently claiming housing benefit facing mounting financial pressures and even eviction from their homes, if they are unable to pay the rent.

If UK landlords do find themselves in the unenviable position of chasing bad debts or rent recovery, or if the worst happens, having to evict defaulting tenants then they should use the services of a reputable eviction specialist such as Legal 4 Landlords, to save effort, money, time and stress.

Tagged with:
 
UK Government to argue the case for Welfare Reform in the House of Lords

Government to argue the case for Welfare Reform in the House of Lords

The coalition Government face another battle over welfare reforms, this time in the House of Lords.
The outcome will affect individuals and families in receipt of local housing allowance (LHA) or housing benefit, who are in private rented sector (PRS) properties.

The Welfare Reform Bill, currently going through the House of Lords, is set to cap total benefits for working age households at £26,000 a year.

The total payment would include the present Local Housing Allowance, paid to housing benefit tenants in private rented sector accommodation.

However, a number of peers fear this would disproportionately hit larger families with children in temporary and private rented sector housing.

The Bishop of Ripon and Leeds, the Right Reverend John Richard Packer, has tabled an amendment which would exclude child benefit for the purposes of the benefit cap.

Lord Richard Best who is also supporting the amendment said: “I don’t think it’s conceivable for families with children to be evicted and become destitute because a benefit cap means there’s nowhere they can afford to live.”

The amendment is expected to go before the Lords next week (January 23rd 2012), and is likely to gain support from many areas, including Liberal Democrat peers who have previously rebelled against the Government.

The UK government’s welfare reforms are bad news for both tenants and landlords. Struggling tenants already face mounting debts and real financial problems including the threat of eviction if they are unable to keep up with the rental payments and slip to more than 8 weeks in arrears.

This results in a double blow for landlords, not only do landlords have to suffer loss of income because the tenants have not paid the rent but also the further expense of court action to have the tenants evicted.

Tenant Evictions can be cost effectively handled by Legal 4 Landlords, who are the UK’s fastest growing eviction specialists who also offer a wide range of additional services for landlords including Rent Guarantee Insurance

No DSS for UK landlords

Landlords Don't Want Benefit Tenants

UK landlords have little confidence in the current Housing Benefit system and the majority would try to avoid accepting tenants in receipt of benefits due to the extra hassle and headaches that dealing with local authorities and local government departments cause.

Landlords claim that tenants who do not receive any form of welfare support are far more reliable when it comes to paying the rent on time and generally looking after the property.

The findings of a survey of over 1,000 UK landlords by flat and house share website Spareroom discovered that:

• 86% of Buy-To-Let landlords surveyed were against the welfare reform of the UK benefit system which since 2008 has automatically paid Local Housing Allowance (LHA) directly to the tenant, except under exceptional circumstances.
• 87% of UK landlords who accept tenants in receipt of Housing Benefit have had problems with the rent not being paid on time.
• 59% of landlords questioned state No DSS when advertising property to let

UK landlords were also asked why they would refuse DSS tenants,

• 11% of landlords have had benefit tenants who have stopped paying the rent.
• 30% believe working tenants are more reliable
• 47% did not want payment problems
(including late payments, no payment at all, issues arising from the suspension of benefit payments and/or damage to the property).
• 34% of landlords currently have LHA tenants in one or more properties
• 45% have previously taken in LHA tenants.
• 58% had previously experienced multiple problems with benefit tenants.
• 74% would refuse LHA tenants even if the tenant had a working, homeowner as a guarantor.

Director of Spareroom, Matt Hutchinson, said: “It’s clear from this survey that a shake-up of the current system of paying housing benefit to the tenant is desperately needed, and reverting back to the old structure, where landlords could receive rental payments directly from the council would be a step in the right direction.”

Legal 4 Landlords spokesman Sim Sekhon agreed; “The current LHA benefit system requires an overhaul as it causes many financial problems for landlords. Unless the tenants are in arrears and the local authority has agreed to make direct payments, the landlord has no guarantee of receiving the full rental payment from the tenant every month, unless they have Rent Guarantee Insurance.

There Will Never Be A Better Time To Invest In Property

MyPropertyPowerTeam.co.uk helps property investors and landlords build their own property power team to enable them to profit from property - Visit our main site now!